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Most psychotherapies do not really work, but those that might work should be assessed in biased studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2016

Abstract

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Commentary to Special Article
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

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Most psychotherapies do not really work, but those that might work should be assessed in biased studies
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Most psychotherapies do not really work, but those that might work should be assessed in biased studies
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