Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

What happened to harmonization of the PTSD diagnosis? The divergence of ICD11 and DSM5

  • J. I. Bisson (a1)

Abstract

The development of ICD11 and DSM5 was seen as an opportunity to harmonize the two major classification systems for mental disorders. The proposed ICD11 and DSM5 diagnostic criteria for PTSD are markedly different. The implications of this remain to be seen, but have the potential to cause confusion to PTSD sufferers, clinicians, researchers and others impacted on by the condition.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      What happened to harmonization of the PTSD diagnosis? The divergence of ICD11 and DSM5
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      What happened to harmonization of the PTSD diagnosis? The divergence of ICD11 and DSM5
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      What happened to harmonization of the PTSD diagnosis? The divergence of ICD11 and DSM5
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Professor J. I. Bisson, Director of Research and Development, Cardiff University School of Medicine & Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, 2nd Floor TB2, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XW, UK. (Email: BissonJI@cardiff.ac.uk)

References

Hide All
American Psychiatric Association (1980). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edn.APA: Washington, DC.
American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Text Revision, 4th edn.APA: Washington, DC.
American Psychiatric Association (2013). DSM-5 Development. Retrieved 11 March 2013 from http://www.dsm5.org.
Brewin, C (2012). ICD11 PTSD. In Presentation at ISTSS Annual Meeting. Los Angeles.
Cloitre, M (2012). ICD11 Complex PTSD. In Presentation at ISTSS Annual Meeting. Los Angeles.
First, MB (2009). Harmonisation of ICD-11 and DSM-V: opportunities and challenges. British Journal of Psychiatry 195, 382390.
Frances, A (2009). Advise to DSM-V: integrate with ICD-11. Psychiatric Times 26, 12.
Friedman, MJ, Resick, PA, Bryant, RA, Brewin, CR (2011). Considering PTSD for DSM5. Depression and Anxiety 28, 750769.
Jablensky, A (2009). Towards ICD-11 and DSM-V: issues beyond harmonisation. British Journal of Psychiatry 195, 379381.
Kendell, R (1991). The relationship between DSM-IV and ICD-10. Journal of Abnormal Psychology 100,–301.
Kupfer, D, Regier, DA, Kuhl, E (2008). On the road to DSM-V and ICD-11. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 258, 26.
Reed, GM (2010). Toward ICD-11: improving the clinical utility of WHO's international classification of mental disorders. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 41, 457464.
World Health Organization (1992). The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. WHO: Geneva.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed