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“White-Collar Crime”: The concept and its potential for the analysis of financial crime

  • Arjan Reurink (a1)
Abstract

Despite the ubiquity of illegality in today’s financial markets and the questions this raises with regard to the social legitimacy of today’s financial industry, systematic scrutiny of the phenomenon of financial crime is lacking in the field of sociology. One field of research in which the illegal dimensions of capitalist dynamics have long taken center stage is the field of white-collar crime research. This article makes available to economic sociologists an overview of the most important conceptual insights generated in the white-collar crime literature. In doing so, its aim is to provide economic sociologists with some orientation for future research on financial crime. Building on the insights generated in wcc literature, the article concludes by suggesting a number of promising avenues for future sociological research on the phenomenon of illegality in financial markets.

Alors que l’omniprésence des illégalismes sur les marchés financiers contemporains interroge la légitimité sociale de l’industrie financière, l’examen systématique du crime financier reste à entreprendre en sociologie. Un champ de recherche s’intéresse depuis longtemps aux dimensions illégales des dynamiques capitalistes, celui du crime dit « en col blanc ». Cet article propose une vision d’ensemble des principales avancées conceptuelles caractéristiques de ce domaine de recherche. A partir des principaux acquis des travaux consacrés à la criminalité en col blanc, l’article suggère pour conclure un certain nombre de pistes prometteuses pour la recherche sociologique sur le phénomène des illégalismes sur les marchés financiers.

Obwohl die weitverbreiteten, illegalen Handlungsweisen der zeitgenössischen Finanzmärkte die soziale Legitimität der Finanzindustrie hinterfragen, hat die Soziologie die Finanzverbrechen noch nicht einer systematischen Untersuchung unterzogen. Ein Forschungsbereich widmet sich seit langem den illegalen Dimensionen der kapitalistischen Dynamiken, es handelt sich um die Verbrechen der Angestellten. Dieser Beitrag vermittelt einen Überblick über die wichtigsten, konzeptuellen Erkenntnisse dieses Forschungsbereichs. Nach einer Darstellung der Haupterrungenschaften dieser Arbeiten, schließt dieser Aufsatz mit der Beschreibung einiger, vielversprechender Ansätze der soziologischen Forschung bezüglich der illegalen Handlungsweisen der zeitgenössischen Finanzmärkte.

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References
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