Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j5sqr Total loading time: 0.468 Render date: 2022-09-29T14:43:10.011Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Different Images of the Future of the Hungarian Communities in Neighbouring Countries, 1989–2012

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2013

Nándor Bárdi*
Affiliation:
Pilisszentiván, Akácfa u.18. H-2084, Hungary. E-mail: bardinandor@gmail.com

Abstract

The paper offers a conceptual framework for interpreting the actions, rhetoric and decisions of the Hungarian communities living in neighbouring countries. Its main topic is covering how post-communist social transformations have been linked to the images these different communities have of the future, including expectations, principles and strategic goals.

Type
Focus: Regimes of Memory
Copyright
Copyright © Academia Europaea 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References and Notes

1. They are involuntary communities because they have come into being not as a result of a social-historical process, but of a political decision. In the new situation, the new communal identities have come into being as a reaction to the nation building practices of the neighbouring countries, involving discriminative policies. This process took place even in regions where, with the exception of Transylvania, the idea of regional belonging had no serious traditions.Google Scholar
2. The tiny Hungarian minority that found itself in Austria did not have organisations of interest representation, and most of them were assimilated.Google Scholar
3. For an overall history of Hungarian minority communities, see Bárdi, N., Fedinec, Cs. and Szarka, L. (eds) (2011) Minority Hungarian Communities in the Twentieth Century (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications).Google Scholar
4. If one interprets the last 200 years of the region's history as the dissolution of empires and the institutionalisation of nations (while fighting for a nation state), then the Hungarian minority communities are caught between the two; and so the project of building ‘Hungarian minority societies’ can also be understood as minority nation building/nationalism. Kántor, Z. (2006) Nationalism, nationalizing minorities and kin-state nationalism. In: F. Ruegg, R. Poledna and C. Rus (eds) (2006) Interculturalism and Discrimination in Romania: Policies, Practices, Identities and Representations (Berlin: LIT Verlag), pp. 249276.Google Scholar
5.Szarka, L. (2004) Kisebbségi léthelyzetek - közösségi alternatívák (Budapest: Lucidus), pp. 113128.Google Scholar
6. In more detail, see: N. Bárdi, Cs. Fedinec and L. Szarka (eds) (2011) Minority Hungarian Communities in the Twentieth Century (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications), pp. 11–20. The most important investigations concerning this topic: Gy. Csepeli, A. Örkény and M. Székelyi (2002) Nemzetek egymás tükrében. Interetnikus viszonyok a Kárpát-medencében (Budapest: Balassi Kiadó); F. Dobos (ed.) (2001) Az autonóm lét kihívásai kisebbségben. Kisebbségi riport (Budapest: Books in Print; Osiris); Gereben, F. (2005) Olvasáskultúra és identitás. A Kárpát-medence magyarságának kulturális és nemzeti azonosságtudata (Budapest: Lucidus).Google Scholar
7. For an overall investigation in Croatia, see Kiss, T. (2010) Drávaszögi mozaik: nemzetiségi egyenlőtlenségek és kisebbségi stratégiák Horvátország magyarlakta településein. Regio, 4, pp. 109162; On the Gypsies of Hungary: I. Kemény (ed.) (2005) Roma of Hungary (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications).Google Scholar
8. According to the 2001 census, out of the 205,000 people with Gypsy attachments, almost 1000 come from abroad, while out of the more than 12 national minorities involving 237,000 people, 14% were born outside Hungary. Tóth, Á. and Vékás, J. (2004) A 2001. évi népszámlálási adatok rövid összefoglalása. Barátság, 5, pp. 44284429.Google Scholar
9.Papp, A. Z. (2011) Some social and demographic features of the Hungarian diaspora in the West and its institutions. In: N. Bárdi, Cs. Fedinec and L. Szarka (eds), Minority Hungarian Communities in the Twentieth Century (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications), pp. 642660.Google Scholar
10. Except for 1910, when the census in Hungary recorded only the mother tongue, the table presents the data of censuses.Google Scholar
11. In 1930 and in 1991, within Czechoslovakia.Google Scholar
12. In 1930 within Czechoslovakia, and in 1989 within the Soviet Union.Google Scholar
13. According to the 1989 census.Google Scholar
14.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 72.Google Scholar
15. I. Hoóz (1996) A nemzetiségi struktúra átalakulása a Kárpát-medencében. Statisztikai Szemle, 11, pp. 930–939.; Kocsis, K., Botlik, Zs. and Tátrai, P. (2006) Etnikai térfolyamatok a Kárpát-medence határainkon túli régióiban (1989–2002) (Budapest: MTA Földrajztudományi Intézet), pp. 2142.Google Scholar
16. Between 1918 and 1924, 350,000 people sought refuge in Hungary. In 1940, after the Second Vienna Award, 190,000 migrated to Hungary from Southern Transylvania, and 220,000 Romanians moved from Northern Transylvania to Romania. In 1944, approximately 350,000 Jews fell victim to the Holocaust on the territories regained by Hungary after 1938. During the Second World War Hungary’ losses were: between 100,000 and 180,000 military, and approximately 45,000 civilians. In 1944, approximately 40,000 people were sent to labour camps, more than half of them did not return. In 1944, the partisan retaliations in Vojvodina led to approximately 20,000–40,000 Hungarian victims. Between 1944 and 1946, approximately 100,000 Transylvanians remained in Hungary. Between 1946 and 1948, the population exchange between Hungary and Czechoslovakia involved the resettlement of 130,000 Hungarians to Hungary and 72,000 Slovaks to Czechoslovakia; approximately 50,000 Hungarians from Southern Slovakia were deported to the Czechlands, and 327,000 Hungarians were ‘re-Slovakised’. Between 1946 and 1948, 185,000 Germans from Hungary were deported from Hungary and approximately 60,000 were taken to labour camps to the Soviet Union. In 1956, 200,000 people left Hungary. Between 1986 and 1992, approximately 60,000 Hungarians resettled from Romania to Hungary. Between 1991 and 1995, during the war, approximately 50,000 Hungarians from Croatia and Vojvodina sought refuge in Hungary.Google Scholar
17.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 95.Google Scholar
18. This increase is probably due to the Schwabs in Szatmár who did not register as Hungarians at the previous census. Kiss, T. (2012) Demográfiai körkép. A kisebbségi magyar közösségek demográfiai helyzete a Kárpát-medencében. Educatio, 1, p. 45.Google Scholar
19.Kiss, T. (2012) Demográfiai körkép. A kisebbségi magyar közösségek demográfiai helyzete a Kárpát-medencében. Educatio, 1, p. 45.Google Scholar
20.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 95.Google Scholar
21. This increase is probably due to the Greek Catholics who did not register as Hungarians at the previous census. Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 95.Google Scholar
22.Csete, Ö., Papp, A. Z. and Setényi, J. (2010) Kárpát-medencei magyar oktatás az ezredfordulón. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 128.Google Scholar
23.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2000) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 81.Google Scholar
24. Except for Székelyland in Romania (Harghita, Covasna and partly Mures counties), the Hungarians living in the neighbouring countries inhabit a stretch of land of approximately 50 km along the border: Southern Slovakia, in Ukraine the area around Berehovo/Beregszász, in Romania between Satu Mare/Szatmárnémeti and Arad, while in Serbia in the Tisza valley, in the region of Subotica/Szabadka, Kanjiža/ Magyarkanizsa, Ada, Zenta.Google Scholar
25. L. Szarka (2001) A városi magyar népesség számának alakulása a Magyarországgal szomszédos országokban (1910–2000). Kisebbségkutatás, 4, 57–67; Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 102.Google Scholar
26.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 90.Google Scholar
27.Csete, Ö., Papp, A. Z. and Setényi, J. (2010) Kárpát-medencei magyar oktatás az ezredfordulón. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), p. 129.Google Scholar
28. In Slovakia the lack of data is extremely significant (over 20%). Most probably this is due to the fact that the questionnaires were self-completed. Non-existing answers were not taken into consideration.Google Scholar
29.Csete, Ö., Papp, A. Z. and Setényi, J. (2010) Kárpát-medencei magyar oktatás az ezredfordulón. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), pp. 9094.Google Scholar
30.Badis, R. (2011) A vajdasági magyar szórványban élők demográfiai helyzete (Zenta: Identitás Kisebbségkutató Műhely), pp. 1415.Google Scholar
31.Gyurgyík, L. (2004) Asszimilációs folyamatok a szlovákiai magyarság körében (Pozsony: Kalligram), p. 109.Google Scholar
32.Gyurgyík, L., Horváth, I. and Kiss, T. (2010) Demográfiai folyamatok, etno-kulturális és társadalmi reprodukció. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), pp. 106114.Google Scholar
33.Papp, A. Z. (2012) Romák és magyar cigányok a Kárpát-medencében. Demográfiai áttekintés. Pro Minoritate, 3, pp. 5379.Google Scholar
34.Dobos, F. (2012) Nemzeti identitás, asszimiláció és médiahasználat a határon túli magyarság körében, 1999–2011 (Budapest: Médiatudományi Intézet), p. 217.Google Scholar
35.http://www.hirado.hu/rovatok/inenglish.aspx. On the social implications of media usage see: Papp, A. Z. and Veress, V. (eds) (2007) Kárpát Panel 2007. A Kárpat-medencei magyarok társadalmi helyzete és perspektívái. Gyorsjelentés (Budapest: MTA Kisebbségkutató Intézet), p. 308.Google Scholar
36.Blénesi, É., Mandel, K. and Szarka, L. (2005) A kultúra világa. A határon túli magyar kulturális intézményrendszer (Budapest: MTA Kisebbségkutató Intézet), p. 292.Google Scholar
37. The programmes can be found in N. Bárdi and Gy. Éger (2000) Válogatás a határon túli magyar érdekvédelmi szervezetek dokumentumaiból 1989–1999 (Budapest: Teleki László Alapítvány), p. 837. For an overview of the problems (with the exception of g) see Öllős, L. (2008) Az egyetértés konfliktusa. A Magyar Köztársaság alkotmánya és a határon túli magyarok (Somorja: Fórum Kisebbségkutató Intézet), pp. 6773.Google Scholar
38. The most important summaries of this strategy: Cs. Tabajdi (1998) Négy év kormányzati munkájának mérlege, s a jövő feladatai. In: Cs. Tabajdi, Az önazonosság labirintúsa (Budapest: CP Stúdió), pp. 587–608; J. Kis (2004) Nemzetegyesítés vagy kisebbségvédelem. Életés Irodalom, December 17; Törzsök, E. (ed.) (2005) Szülőföld Program. Stratégiai tanulmány (Budapest: MEH Európai Integrációs Iroda).Google Scholar
39.Németh, Zs. (2002) Magyar kibontakozás (Budapest: Püski), p. 241.Google Scholar
40. L. Szarka (2002) Szerződéses nemzet. In Z. Kántor (ed.) A státustörvény: előzményekés következmények (Budapest: Teleki László Alapítvány), pp. 407–409; Németh, Zs. (2002) Magyar kibontakozás (Budapest: Püski), pp. 123129.Google Scholar
41. The review Provincia: http://www.provincia.ro/index.html; M. Bakk (2003) Kerettörvény a régiókról, 2003, http://www.adatbank.ro/html/cim_pdf503.pdf; Törzsök, E. (2003) Kisebbségek változó világban (Kolozsvár: A Református Egyház Misztófalusi Kis Miklós Sajtóközpontja), p. 271.Google Scholar
42. L. Szarka (2004) A kormányzati szerepvállalás hatása a kisebbségi magyar pártok önkormányzati politikájára. In: É. Blénesi, K. Mandel (eds), Kisebbségek és kormánypolitika Közép-Európában (2002–2004) (Budapest: Gondolat – MTA Etnikai-nemzeti Kisebbségkutató Intézet), pp. 231--258; N. Bárdi and Z. Kántor (2000) Az RMDSZ a romániai kormányban, 1996–2000. Regio, 4, pp. 150–187; Hamberger, J. (2004) A magyar–szlovák viszony esélyei az MKP kormányzati helyzetének tükrében. Külügyi Szemle, 1–2, pp. 2947.Google Scholar
43.Bárdi, N. and Misovicz, T. (2010) A kisebbségi magyar közösségek támogatásának politikája. In: B. Bitskey (ed.), Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal), pp. 199232.Google Scholar
45.Lázár, G. (1996) A felnőtt lakosság nemzeti identitása a kisebbségekhez való viszony tükrében. In: G. Lázár (ed.), Többség – kisebbség. Tanulmányok a nemzeti tudat témaköréből (Budapest: Osiris – MTA-ELTE Kommunikációelméleti Kutatócsoport), pp. 9115.Google Scholar
46. Some 200,000 people did not manage to receive even the new citizenship, while 350,000 took refuge to Hungary after 1918.Google Scholar
47. Here are some of the historical cataclysms: requisitions of houses in Romania, 1920; flight from Southern Transylvania, 1940; holocaust on the re-attached territories; deportations in Transcarpathia, Czechoslovakia; partisan revenge in Vojvodina, 1944; flight from Transylvania, 1944; population exchange with Czechoslovakia and ‘re-Slovakisation’; in Transylvania repressions against those who sympathised with the revolution of 1956; the anti-Hungarian campaigns of the Ceauşescu regime, 1986–1989; mobilisation in Vojvodina and exodus during the wars, 1991.Google Scholar
48. The problem was first discussed by Sándor Makkai. See Cseke, P. and Molnár, G. (eds) (1989) Nem lehet. A kisebbségi sors vitája (Budapest: Héttorony), p. 267.Google Scholar
49. Here are some examples: can one interpret properly the relationship of the Hungarian Jewry to the Hungarian state and to assimilation, if one ignores the reactions of this ethic group to the new power relationships after 1920? This is important if one takes into account that the Jews were accused of dissimilation from Hungarians, and the examples were taken from the neighbouring countries. Later, the Jewry of the re-annexed territories became a victim of the holocaust.Google Scholar
50. Can one shed light on the ideas promoted by the Hungarian left concerning the national question without clarifying the role of the inter-war review Korunk, respectively the pressures exerted by the Hungarian minorities’ left-wing elites in Hungary during the 1960s and 1970s?Google Scholar
51. Can one understand the campaigns for dual citizenship if one ignores the post-Yugoslav practices in this respect? If one ignores the Romanian developmental history of Imre Borbély and Miklós Patrubány, the promoters of this agenda?Google Scholar
52. There are several investigations measuring the identity of minority Hungarians and their loyalty to the state. But they present first of all relations, and not the content of civic culture or identity. Probably some representative investigations in multinational regions would be helpful, asking the relationship of people to the state, the political system, to cultural values. Then one could see whether the Hungarians differ from others according to these indicators. An overview, according to countries, is given by Papp, A. Z. and Veress, V. (eds) (2007) Kárpát Panel 2007. A Kárpát-medencei magyarok társadalmi helyzete és perspektívái. Gyorsjelentés (Budapest: MTA Kisebbségkutató Intézet), p. 308.Google Scholar
53. In December 2011, more than half of the Hungarian respondents did not agree with the right to vote: http://www.valasztasirendszer.hu/?p=1940384Google Scholar

Further Reading Books

Badis, R. (2011) A vajdasági magyar szórványban élők demográfiai helyzete (Zenta: Identitás Kisebbségkutató Műhely).Google Scholar
Bárdi, N. and Éger, Gy. (eds) (2000) Válogatás a határon túli magyar érdekvédelmi szervezetek dokumentumaiból 1989–1999 (Budapest: Teleki László Alapítvány).Google Scholar
Bárdi, N., Fedinec, Cs. and Szarka, L. (eds) (2011) Minority Hungarian Communities in the Twentieth Century (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications).Google Scholar
Bitskey, B. (ed.) (2010) Határon túli magyarság a 21. században. Konferencia sorozat a Sándor-palotában. Tanulmánykötet (Budapest: Köztársasági Elnöki Hivatal).Google Scholar
Blénesi, É. and Mandel, K. (eds) (2004) Kisebbségek és kormánypolitika Közép-Európában (2002–2004) (Budapest: Gondolat – MTA Etnikai-nemzeti Kisebbségkutató Intézet).Google Scholar
Blénesi, É., Mandel, K. and Szarka, L. (2005) A kultúra világa. A határon túli magyar kulturális intézményrendszer (Budapest: MTA Kisebbségkutató Intézet).Google Scholar
Cseke, P. and Molnár, G. (eds) (1989) Nem lehet. A kisebbségi sors vitája (Budapest: Héttorony).Google Scholar
Csepeli, Gy., Örkény, A. and Székelyi, M. (2002) Nemzetek egymás tükrében. Interetnikus viszonyok a Kárpát-medencében (Budapest: Balassi Kiadó).Google Scholar
Dobos, F. (2012) Nemzeti identitás, asszimiláció és médiahasználat a határon túli magyarság körében, 1999–2011 (Budapest: Médiatudományi Intézet).Google Scholar
Dobos, F. (ed.) (2001) Az autonóm lét kihívásai kisebbségben. Kisebbségi riport, (Budapest: Books in Print; Osiris).Google Scholar
Gereben, F. (2005) Olvasáskultúra és identitás. A Kárpát-medence magyarságának kulturális és nemzeti azonosságtudata (Budapest: Lucidus).Google Scholar
Gyurgyík, L. (2004) Asszimilációs folyamatok a szlovákiai magyarság körében (Pozsony: Kalligram).Google Scholar
Kántor, Z. (ed.) (2002) A státustörvény: előzmények és következmények (Budapest: Teleki László Alapítvány).Google Scholar
Kemény, I. (ed.) (2005) Roma of Hungary (Boulder, CO; Highland Lakes, NJ: Social Science Monographs; Atlantic Research and Publications).Google Scholar
Kocsis, K., Botlik, Zs. and Tátrai, P. (2006) Etnikai térfolyamatok a Kárpát-medence határainkon túli régióiban (1989–2002) (Budapest: MTA Földrajztudományi Intézet).Google Scholar
Lázár, G. (ed.) (1996) Többség – kisebbség. Tanulmányok a nemzeti tudat témaköréből, (Budapest: Osiris – MTA-ELTE Kommunikációelméleti Kutatócsoport).Google Scholar
Németh, Zs. (2002) Magyar kibontakozá (Budapest: Püski).Google Scholar
Öllős, L. (2008) Az egyetértés konfliktusa. A Magyar Köztársaság alkotmánya és a határon túli magyarok (Somorja: Fórum Kisebbségkutató Intézet).Google Scholar
Papp, Z. and Veress, V. (eds) (2007) Kárpát Panel 2007. A Kárpát-medencei magyarok társadalmi helyzete és perspektívái. Gyorsjelentés (Budapest: MTA Kisebbségkutató Intézet).Google Scholar
Ruegg, F., Poledna, R. and Rus, C. (eds) (2006) Interculturalism and Discrimination in Romania: policies, practices, identities and representations (Berlin: LIT Verlag).Google Scholar
Szarka, L. (2004) Kisebbségi léthelyzetek-közösségi alternatívák (Budapest: Lucidus).Google Scholar
Tabajdi, Cs. (1998) Az önazonosság labirintúsa (Budapest: CP Stúdió).Google Scholar
Törzsök, E. (2003) Kisebbségek változó világban (Kolozsvár: A Református Egyház Misztófalusi Kis Miklós Sajtóközpontja).Google Scholar
Törzsök, E. (ed.) (2005) Szülőföld Program. Stratégiai tanulmány (Budapest: MEH Európai Integrációs Iroda).StudiesGoogle Scholar
Bakk, M. (2003) Kerettörvény a régiókról, http://www.adatbank.ro/html/cim_pdf503.pdfGoogle Scholar
Bárdi, N. and Kántor, Z. (2000) Az RMDSZ a romániai kormányban, 1996–2000. Regio, 4, pp. 150187.Google Scholar
Hamberger, J. (2004) A magyar–szlovák viszony esélyei az MKP kormányzati helyzetének tükrében. Külügyi Szemle, 1–2, pp. 2947.Google Scholar
Hoóz, I. (1996) A nemzetiségi struktúra átalakulása a Kárpát-medencében. Statisztikai Szemle, 11, pp. 930939.Google Scholar
Kis, J. (2004) Nemzetegyesítés vagy kisebbségvédelem. Élet és Irodalom, December 17.Google Scholar
Kiss, T. (2012) Demográfiai körkép. A kisebbségi magyar közösségek demográfiai helyzete a Kárpát-medencében. Educatio, 1, pp. 2448.Google Scholar
Kiss, T. (2010) Drávaszögi mozaik: nemzetiségi egyenlőtlenségek és kisebbségi stratégiák Horvátország magyarlakta településein. Regio, 4, pp. 109162.Google Scholar
Papp, A. Z. (2012) Romák és magyar cigányok a Kárpát-medencében. Demográfiai áttekintés,. Pro Minoritate, 3, pp. 5379.Google Scholar
Szarka, L. (2001) A város magyar népesség számának alakulása a Magyarországgal szomszédos országokban (1910–2000). Kisebbségkutatás, 4, pp. 5767.Google Scholar
Tóth, Á. and Vékás, J. (2004) A 2001. évi népszámlálási adatok rövid összefoglalása. Barátság, 5, pp. 44284429.Google Scholar
6
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Different Images of the Future of the Hungarian Communities in Neighbouring Countries, 1989–2012
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Different Images of the Future of the Hungarian Communities in Neighbouring Countries, 1989–2012
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Different Images of the Future of the Hungarian Communities in Neighbouring Countries, 1989–2012
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *