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Traditions in the construction of cultural identity and strategies of ethnic survival

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 July 2009

Abstract

Cultures may be viewed as systems of elements constituted through the selection, interpretation and internalization of traditions by individuals and groups. Group identities may be viewed as cores of living tradition systems based on a limited number of key symbols and tales of identity. The cultural identities of Finno-Ugrian minorities in present-day Russia are at risk and uncertainty prevails concerning the strategies to be adopted in their defence. What are the cultural resources for ethnic survival and what principles may be discerned in a basic strategy that should be flexible enough to be modified according to thousands of different minority situations?

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Academia Europaea 1995

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