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‘Master of Those Who Know’: Aristotle as Role Model for the Twenty-first Century Academician

  • Edith Hall (a1)

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1. Carroll, M.D. (1984) Rembrandt’s ‘Aristotle’: Exemplary Beholder. Artibus et Historiae 5, pp. 3556, at 48.
2. Vossius, G.J. (1696) De Artium et Scientiarum natura ac constitutiones (Amsterdam), pp 38, 229.
3.I have published a study of Aristotle’s relegation of women to second-class citizen status, and collaborated on research into the use of his Politics by ante-bellum slave owners: see E. Hall (2015) Citizens but second-class: women in Aristotle’s politics. In: C. Cuttica and G. Mahlberg (Eds.), Patriarchal Moments (London: ), ch. 3; S.S. Monoson (2011) Recollecting Aristotle: proslavery thought in antebellum America and the argument of Politics Book I. In: E. Hall, R. Alston and J. McConnell (Eds.), Ancient Slavery and Abolition (Oxford: Oxford University Press), ch. 9.
4. Palmer, J.A. (2000) Aristotle on the ancient theologians. Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science, 33, pp. 181205 at 187.
5. Broadie, S. (2003) Aristotelian piety. Phronesis, 48, pp. 5470.
6.See, for example, Worden, S. (2009) Aristotle’s natural wealth: the role of limitation in thwarting misordered concupiscence. Journal of Business Ethics, 84, pp. 209219.
7. Snow, C.P. (1959) The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), p. 4.
8.He had first tried out the argument in an article published in New Statesman for 6 October 1956.
9. Kagan, J. (2009) The Three Cultures (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
10. Quandt, K. (1981) Some puns in Aristotle. Transactions of the American Philological Association, 111, pp. 179196.
11. Tierney, P.J. (2012) Theocracy: Can Democracy Survive Fundamentalism? Resolving the Conflict between Fundamentalism and Pluralism (Bloomington, IN: ), pp. 165166; D.S. New (2012) Christian Fundamentalism in America: A Cultural History (Jefferson, NC: iUniverse).
12. Leroi, A.M. (2014) The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science (London and New York: Bloomsbury).
13. Mandeville, J. (1900) The Travels (the version of the Cotton Manuscript in modern spelling, London and New York: Macmillan), p. 12: ‘In this country was Aristotle born, in a city that men clepe Stagyra, a little from the city of Thrace. And at Stagyra lieth Aristotle; and there is an altar upon his tomb. And there make men great feasts for him every year, as though he were a saint. And at his altar they holden their great councils and their assemblies, and they hope, that through inspiration of God and of him, they shall have the better council.’
14.See Walston, C. (1892) The finding of the tomb of Aristotle. Century, 44, pp. 414426.
15. Eginitis, D. (1929) The problem of the tide of Euripus. Astronomische Nachrichten, 236, 321338.
16.See the patristic sources in J.-P. Migne (1857-1945) Patrologia Graeca (Paris: Garnier) 36.1004, 35.597 and 6.305, with A.-H. Chroust (1964) A brief account of the traditional Vitae Aristotelis. Revue des études grecques, 77, pp. 50–69.
17. Rosen, E. (Ed.) (1967) Kepler’s Somnium: The Dream, Or Posthumous Work on Lunar Astronomy (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press), 42–43 and 214–215.
18 Owen, R. (1992) The Hunterian Lectures in Comparative Anatomy (May and June 1837). P.R. Sloan, (Ed.) (Chicago: Chicago University Press), p. 91.
19. Leroi, AM. (2014) The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science (London and New York: Bloomsbury), pp. 60, 419. Aristotle’s references to diagrams and tables in his works are analysed by in C. Natali (2013) Aristotle: His Life and School (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press), ch. 3.3.
20. Connell, S.M. (2001) Toward an integrated approach to Aristotle as a biological philosopher. The Review of Metaphysics, 55, pp. 297322 at 313.
21.You can even see a reconstruction of such a temple mechanism, which used science to bolster belief in the supernatural, since it has been reconstructed by Kostas Kotsanas at his Museum of Ancient Greek Technology and Inventions in Katakolo, western Peloponnese.
22. Connell, S.M. (2001) Toward an integrated approach to Aristotle as a biological philosopher. The Review of Metaphysics, 55, pp. 297–322.
23. Connell, S.M. (2001) Toward an integrated approach to Aristotle as a biological philosopher. The Review of Metaphysics, 55, pp. 300, 302, 303.
24. Gotthelf, A. (Ed.) (1985) Introduction, in: Aristotle on Nature and Living Things (Bristol: Bristol Classical Press), p. viii.
25. Connell, S.M. (2001) Toward an integrated approach to Aristotle as a biological philosopher. The Review of Metaphysics, 55, pp. 303304, 320.
26. Morgan, L.M. (2013) The potentiality principle from Aristotle to abortion. Current Anthropology, 54, S7, pp. 15–25, at 15.
27. Morgan, L.M. (2013) The potentiality principle from Aristotle to abortion. Current Anthropology, 54, S7, pp. 1525, at 15 and 16.
28. Morgan, L.M. (2013) The potentiality principle from Aristotle to abortion. Current Anthropology, 54, S7, p. 22.
29.For this notorious passage in the Politics, see Hall, E. (2015) Citizens but second-class: women in Aristotle’s politics. In: C. Cuttica and G. Mahlberg, (Eds.), Patriarchal Moments (London: Bloomsbury).
30. Jackson, M. (2001) Designed by theorists: Aristotle on utopia. Utopian Studies, 12, pp. 112.
31. Rheingold, H. (2003) Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution (Cambridge, MA: Basic Books).
32.See Wyles, R. and Hall, E. (Eds) (2016) Women Classical Scholars: Unsealing the Fountain from the Renaissance to Jacqueline de Romilly (Oxford: Oxford University Press), index s.v. ‘Aristotle’. The similar sentiment with which Aristotle opens his Metaphysics (1.980a) is often cited at the same time.
33.See further Leroi, AM. (2014) The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science (London and New York: Bloomsbury), pp. 444456.
34.On the possible connection between Alexander, after his conquest of the Persian Empire, and the absolute monarch, the Pambasileus of Politics book 3, see Nagle, D.B. (2000) Alexander and Aristotle’s ‘Pambasileus’. L’Antiquité Classique, 69, pp. 117132.
36.Emphasis added. A video of this sermon is available for viewing in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Records held in the Emory University Archives (Program 7652): see http://findingaids.library.emory.edu/documents/sclc1083/series19/subseries19.1/

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