Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Transitional Women in the Transnational Era: Female Voices through Art

  • Silvia Pellicer-Ortín (a1)

Abstract

This article supports the belief that transnational and glocal mechanisms have drastically affected identity and memory formation processes; thus, very diverse memories regarding complex episodes of migration or trauma are currently regarded as connected through multidirectional and cross-cultural patterns. Drawing on the fields of Trauma and Memory Studies, which consider the therapeutic role of art to represent and abreact troubled individual and collective experiences, the new hybrid identities born from this exchange and relationality have proved to demand new forms of representation. In particular, numerous groups of transitional women have recently fostered transnational engagements of womanhood through their creative works. Thus, some contemporary examples will be provided to show how art can be an empowering tool for contemporary transitional women to acquire a voice as well as a promoter of empathy for the modern glocal subject.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Transitional Women in the Transnational Era: Female Voices through Art
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Transitional Women in the Transnational Era: Female Voices through Art
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Transitional Women in the Transnational Era: Female Voices through Art
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
1. Robertson, R. (1992) Globalization: Social Theory and Global Culture (London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi: SAGE Publications), p. 8.
2. Castles, S. and Miller, M.J. (2003) The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World (London: Palgrave Macmillan), p. 1.
3. Friedman, S.S. (2006) Migrations, diasporas, and borders. In: D. Nicholls, (Ed.), Introduction to Scholarship in Modern Languages and Literatures (New York: MLA), pp. 899941 , 906.
4. Ateljevic, I. (2013) Visions of transmodernity: A new renaissance of our human history? Integral Review, 9(2), pp. 200219 207.
5. Rodríguez Magda, R.M. (2004) Transmodernidad (Barcelona: Anthropos), p. 30.
6. Ferree, M.M. (2006) Globalization and feminism: Opportunities and obstacles for activism in the global arena. In: M.M. Ferree and A.M. Tripp (Eds), Global Feminism: Transnational Women’s Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights (New York and London: New York University Press), pp. 323 4.
7.This term, defined as: ʻthe simultaneous occurrence of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies in contemporary social, political, end economic systemsʼ (Encyclopedia Britannica, accessed on 9 September 2016 at https://global.britannica.com/topic/glocalization) originated in Japanese agriculture, and spread from the world of business, where it alludes to the expansion of multinational companies, to academic and popular discourse.
8. Rothberg, M. (2009) Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (Stanford: Stanford University Press), p. 3, emphasis in original.
9. Silverman, M. (2013) Palimpsestic Memory: The Holocaust and Colonialism in French and Francophone Fiction and Film (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books), p. 23.
10.The concept of minority applied in this study follows Castles and Miller’s notion that a minority is constructed through a mutual process of both Other and Self-definition: ‘Other-definition refers to various forms of exclusion and discrimination (or racism). Self-definition has a dual character. It includes assertion and recreation of ethnic identity, centred upon pre-migration cultural symbols and practices. It also includes political mobilization against exclusion and discrimination, using cultural symbols and practices in an instrumental way.’ S. Castles and M.J. Miller (2003) The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World (London: Palgrave Macmillan), pp. 7–8.
11. Radstone, S. (2011) What place is this? Transcultural memory and the locations of memory studies. Parallax, 17(4), pp. 109123, 110.
12. Schramm, K. (2011) Introduction: Landscapes of violence: memory and sacred space. History & Memory, 23(1), pp. 522, 5.
13. Erll, A. (2011) Travelling memory. Parallax, 17(4), pp. 418.
14. Adorno, T. (1978) Minima moralia: Reflections from a damaged life, Trans. E.F.N. Jephcott (London: Verso); T. Adorno (1984) In: G. Adorno and R. Tiedemann (Eds), Aesthetic Theory. Trans. C. Lendhart (London: Routledge).
15. Benjamin, W. (1985) One-way Street and Other Writings, Trans. E. Jephcott and K. Shorter (London: Verso); W. Benjamin (1992) The storyteller. In: W. Benjamin, Illuminations (London: Fontana Press), pp. 83–107.
16. O’Neill, M. (2008) Transnational refugees: The transnational role of art? Forum: qualitative social research, 9(2), Art. 59, May 2008. Accessed on 10 October 2016 at: http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/403/873.
17. Hall, S. (1997) Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (London : Sage and Open University), p. 50.
18. Bloom, S.L. (2010) Bridging the black hole of trauma: The evolutionary significance of the arts. Psychotherapy and Politics International, 8(3), pp. 198212 , 200–203.
19. Nelson, L.H. (2001) Damages Identities, Narrative Repair (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press), p. xii.
20. Foster, H. (1996) The Return of the Real: The Avant-Garde at the End of the Century (London: October Books), G. Hartman (2003) Trauma within the limits of literature. European Journal of English Studies, 7(3), pp. 257–274.
21. Freud, S. and Breuer, J. (1991 [1893]) On the Psychical Mechanism of Hysterical Phenomena: Preliminary Communication . In: J. and A. Strachey, (Eds and trans) Studies on Hysteria (London: Penguin), pp. 5369.
22. Janet, P. (1901) The Mental State of Hystericals: A Study of Mental Stigmata and Mental Accidents, Trans. C. Rollin Corson (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons).
23. Jung, C.G. (1990 [1959]) In: M. Fordham and G. Adler, (Eds) The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious. The Collected Works of Carl Jung, vol. 9.1, Trans R. C. Hull and H. Read (London: Routledge).
24. Henke, S.A. (1998) Shattered Subjects: Trauma and Testimony in Women’s Life-Writing (London: Macmillan), pp. xiixiii.
25. Caruth, C. (Ed.) (1995) Trauma: Explorations in Memory (Baltimore, MD and London: Johns Hopkins University Press); R. Granofsky (1995) The Trauma Novel: Contemporary Symbolic Depictions of Collective Disaster (New York: Peter Lang); R. Luckhurst (2008) The Trauma Question (London: Routledge); A. Whitehead (2004) Trauma Fiction (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press).
26. LaCapra, D. (2001) Writing History, Writing Trauma (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press), p. 41.
27. Levinas, E. (1981 [1974]) Otherwise than Being: or, Beyond Essence, Trans. A. Lingis (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff); E. Levinas (1991 [1961]) Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority. Trans. Alphonso Lingis (London: Kluwer Academic Publishers).
28. Onega, S. (2014) The notion of paradigm shift and the roles of science and literature in the interpretation of reality. European Review, 22, 491503, 498.
29. Attridge, D. (2004) The Singularity of Literature (London and New York: Routledge), p. 3.
30. Ganteau, J.M. (2014) vulnerable form and traumatic vulnerability: Jon McGregor’s Even the Dogs . In: S. Onega and J.M. Ganteau, (Eds), Contemporary Trauma Narratives: Liminality and Ethics of Form (New York and London: Routledge), pp. 89103, 100–101.
31. Lyotard, J.F. (1979 [1984]) The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge, Trans C. Bennington (Manchester: Manchester University Press).
32. Tew, P. (2007) The Contemporary British Novel (London and New York: Continuum), p. 15.
33. Ganteau, J.M. (2015) The Ethics and Aesthetics of Vulnerability in Contemporary British Fiction (New York and Oxon: Routledge), p. 26.
34. Heilmann, A. and Lewellyn, M. (Eds) (2007) Metafiction and Metahistory in Contemporary Women’s Writing (Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan), p. 3.
35. Achebe, Ch. (2000) Home and Exile (Oxford: Oxford University Press), p. 79.
36. Rothberg, M. (2014) Preface: beyond Tancred and Clorinda – Trauma studies for subjects. In: G. Buelens, S. Durrant and R. Eaglestone, (Eds) The Future of Trauma Theory: Contemporary Literary and Cultural Criticism (London and New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group), pp. xixviii, xvii.
37. Figes, E. (1986 [1970]) Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society (London: Virago); E. Showalter (1988 [1977]) A Literature of their Own: British Women Novelists from Brontë to Lessing (London: Virago).
38. Basow, S. (1992) Gender Stereotypes and Roles (Belmont: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company); J. Butler (2006 [1990]) Gender Trouble (New York: Routledge).
39. Waugh, P. (2004) Feminism and writing: The politics of culture. In: L. Marcus and P. Nicholls, (Eds), The Cambridge History of Twentieth Century of English Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), pp. 600617, 602.
40. Andermahr, S. and Pellicer-Ortín, S. (2013) Trauma Narratives and Herstory (London, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan), p. 9.
41. Hondagneu-Sotelo, P. (2000) Feminism and migration. Annals of the American Academy, 571, pp. 107120, 116.
42. Neyts, K. (2015) Female migration, urban relocation and remaking home: Excerpts from a report. Open Democracy. Accessed on 21 February 2016 at https://www.opendemocracy.net/womenoftheworld/female-migration-urban-relocation-and-remaking-home.
43. Gilmore, L. and Marshall, E. (2010) Girls in crisis: Rescue and transnational feminist autobiographical resistance. Feminist Studies, 36(3), pp. 667690.
44. Alexander, M.J. (2005) Pedagogies of Crossing: Mediations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memories and the Sacred (Durham and London: Duke University Press).
45. Blackwell, M., Briggs, L. and Chiu, M. (2015) Transnational feminisms roundtable. Frontiers, 36(3), 125 2–3.
46. Anzaldúa, G. (1987) Borderlands/La Frontera (San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books)
47. Sun, E., Peretz, E. and Baer, U. (2007) The Claims of Literature: A Shoshana Felman Reader (Yale: Fordham University Press), p. 1.
48. Grewal, I. and Kaplan, C. (1994) Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Trasnational Feminist Practices (Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press), p. 21.
49. Boxall, P. (2013) Twenty-First Century Fiction: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), p. 168.
50. Morrison, T. (2007 [1987]) Beloved (London: Vintage Books), p. 21.
51. Domínguez-Rue, E. (2013) History unwritten: Trauma, memory, identity and history in Toni Morrison’s Beloved. In: S. Andermahr and S. Pellicer-Ortín, (Eds), Trauma Narratives and Herstory (London, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan), pp. 141152, 151.
52. Smith, Z. (2001) White Teeth (London: Vintage Books), p. 193.
53. Gilmore, L. (2001) The Limits of Autobiography: Trauma and Testimony (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press).
54. Pellicer-Ortín, S. (2014) Separatedness and connectednessʼ: Generational trauma and the ethical impulse in Anne Karpf’s The War After: Living with the Holocaust . In: S. Onega and J.M. Ganteau, (Eds) Contemporary Trauma Narratives: Liminality and the Ethics of Form (New York: Routledge), pp. 193209, 194–195.
55. Karpf, A. (1996, 2008). The War After: Living with the Holocaust (London: Minerva)
56. Karpf, A. (1996) On The War After: Anne Karpf. Accessed on 18 April 2012 at http://www.faber.co.uk/article/2008/12/war-after-anne-karpf/.
57. Wandor, M. (2004) At the edges of the centre; or close encounters of a Jewish kind; or the D word. In: U. Behlau and B. Retiz, (Eds), Women’s Writing of the 1990s and Beyond in Great Britain and the United States (MUSE: Mainz), pp. 1725, 23.
58. Kaplan, K. (1987) Deterritorialization: The rewriting of home and exile in western feminist discourse. Cultural Critique, 6, Special Issue The Nature and Context of Minority Discourse 187198, 198.
59. Lightman, S. (2014) Graphic Details: Jewish Women’s Confessional Comics in Essays and Interviews (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company).
60.Gwendolyn Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona’s Ms. Marvel No Normal (2014).
61.Some telling examples may be observed on their official website: http://www.migrantas.org/web_migrantas_english.html (accessed on 22 February 2016).
62. Laub, D. and Podell, D. (1995) Art and trauma. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 76(5), 9911005, 998.
63. Tripp, A.M. (2006) The evolution of transnational feminisms: Consensus, conflict, and new dynamics. In: M.M. Ferree and A.M. Tripp, (Eds), Global Feminism: Transnational Women’s Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights (London and New York: New York University Press), pp. 5178, 51–52, emphasis added.
64. Berger, J. (1992 [1989]) Miners. Exhibition catalogue. In Keeping a Rendezvous (London: Vintage), p. 9.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed