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The Role of Rhizobial Biodiversity in Legume Crop Productivity in the West Asian Highlands

II. Rhizobium Leguminosarum

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2008

L. A. Materon
Affiliation:
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Aleppo, Syria
J. D. H. Keatinge
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Berkshire, England;
D. P. Beck
Affiliation:
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Aleppo, Syria
N. Yurtsever
Affiliation:
Soil and Fertilizer Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Ankara, Turkey
K. Karuc
Affiliation:
Soil and Fertilizer Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Ankara, Turkey
S. Altuntas
Affiliation:
Soil and Fertilizer Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Ankara, Turkey

Summary

The native rhizobia capable of symbiosis with annually-sown food and forage legume crops in the Turkish highlands were surveyed and estimates made of the numbers and nitrogen fixing efficiency of native Rhizobium leguminosarum with Turkish cultivars of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and vetch (Vicia sativa L.). Native rhizobia were present in medium to high numbers in most samples but the nitrogen fixation efficiency of at least half of the isolates was poor. Vetch was somewhat less specific in its rhizobial compatibility than lentil, suggesting a potential for artificial inoculation to improve the productivity and sustainability of cropping in both species especially in areas of central and eastern Anatolia where legumes are not traditionally grown.

Biodiversidad en el Rhizobium leguminosarum

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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