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Conventional and unconventional analysis of an inversion in Neurospora

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Barbara C. Turner
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
David D. Perkins
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
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Summary

In(IL; IR)O Y348 is a pericentric inversion of linkage group I in N. crassa, with a breakpoint between fr and un-5 in the left arm and a breakpoint between ad-9 and nit-1 in the right arm. Approximate breakpoint location was found by tabulating crossovers between the rearrangement and markers in normal chromosome sequence. Inversion structure was verified by marked In O Y348 × In O Y348 crosses. Precise mapping of breakpoints was by duplication coverage. Inversions like O Y348 do not produce progeny with segmental chromosome duplications when crossed to normal sequence, but duplications were produced by crossing it to In(IL; IR)O Y323 (Barry & Leslie, 1982), another standard pericentric inversion, and to T(I → VI)NM103 (Turner, 1977), a translocation to a tip. Each of these rearrangements has a breakpoint within the inverted region of In O Y348. Two duplications from In O Y348 × In O Y323 were converted to normal chromosome sequence by double mitotic recombination. Besides expediting mapping, the technique of intercrossing rearrangements increasingly enables us to make segmental duplications exactly tailored for studying specific included genes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1982

References

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