Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-9w8k4 Total loading time: 0.274 Render date: 2022-12-10T06:48:48.246Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

The genetics of tasting in mice: V. Glycine and cycloheximide

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Ian E. Lush*
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics and Biometry, University College London, Wolfson House, 4 Stephenson Way, London NWl 2HE
Gail Holland
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics and Biometry, University College London, Wolfson House, 4 Stephenson Way, London NWl 2HE
*
Corresponding author.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Summary

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Glycine tastes both bitter and sweet to mice but there are differences between strains in their ability to detect each taste. With respect to the bitter taste, fifteen strains were classified as tasters and twelve strains as non-tasters. The difference is due to a single gene, Glb (glycine bitterness). Cycloheximide tastes bitter to all mice at a concentration of 8 μM, but strain differences in sensitivity to the taste of cycloheximide can be detected at lower concentrations. The BXD RI strains can be classified into two groups with respect to sensitivity to cycloheximide. This is probably due to the segregation of two alleles of a single gene, Cyx. A comparison of the distribution in RI strains of alleles of four bitterness-tasting genes shows that the loci are all closely linked and are probably in the order Cyx–Qui–Rua–Glb.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

References

Azen, E. A., Carlson, D. M., Clements, S., Lalley, P. A. & Vanin, E. (1984). Salivary proline-rich protein genes on chromosome 8. Science 226, 967969.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Azen, E. A., Lush, I. E. & Taylor, B. A. (1986). Close linkage of mouse genes for salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and taste. Trends in Genetics 2, 199200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Békésy, G. von (1964). Sweetness produced electrically on the tongue and its relation to taste theories. Journal of Applied Physiology 19, 11051113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lush, I. E. (1981). The genetics of tasting in mice I. Sucrose octaacetate. Genetical Research 38, 9395.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lush, I. E. (1982). The genetics of tasting in mice II. Strychnine. Chemical Senses 7, 9398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lush, I. E. (1984). The genetics of tasting in mice III. Quinine. Genetical Research 44, 151160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lush, I. E. (1986 a). The genetics of tasting in mice. IV. The acetates of raffinose, galactose and β-lactose. Genetical Research 47, 117123.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lush, I. E. (1986 6). Differences between mouse strains in their consumption of phenylthiourea (PTC). Heredity 57, 319323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mamula, P. W., Heerema, N. A., Palmer, C. G., Lyons, K. M. & Karn, R. C. (1985). Localization of the human salivary protein complex (SPC) to chromosome band 12p13.2. Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 39, 279284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Searle, A. G., Peters, J., Lyon, M. F., Evans, E. P., Edwards, J. H. & Buckle, V. T. (1987). Chromosome maps of man and mouse, III. Genomics 1, 318.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Silver, J. (1985). Confidence limits for estimates of gene linkage based on analysis of recombinant inbred strains. Journal of Heredity 76, 436440.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tobach, E., Bellin, J. S. & Das, D. K. (1974). Differences in bitter taste perception in three strains of rats. Behaviour Genetics 4, 405410.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The genetics of tasting in mice: V. Glycine and cycloheximide
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The genetics of tasting in mice: V. Glycine and cycloheximide
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The genetics of tasting in mice: V. Glycine and cycloheximide
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *