Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-2z7pd Total loading time: 0.166 Render date: 2021-05-08T05:36:15.110Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The hitch-hiking effect of a favourable gene

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

John Maynard Smith
Affiliation:
University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH
John Haigh
Affiliation:
University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Summary

When a selectively favourable gene substitution occurs in a population, changes in gene frequencies will occur at closely linked loci. In the case of a neutral polymorphism, average heterozygosity will be reduced to an extent which varies with distance from the substituted locus. The aggregate effect of substitution on neutral polymorphism is estimated; in populations of total size 106 or more (and perhaps of 104 or more), this effect will be more important than that of random fixation. This may explain why the extent of polymorphism in natural populations does not vary as much as one would expect from a consideration of the equilibrium between mutation and random fixation in populations of different sizes. For a selectively maintained polymorphism at a linked locus, this process will only be important in the long run if it leads to complete fixation. If the selective coefficients at the linked locus are small compared to those at the substituted locus, it is shown that the probability of complete fixation at the linked locus is approximately exp (− Nc), where c is the recombinant fraction and N the population size. It follows that in a large population a selective substitution can occur in a cistron without eliminating a selectively maintained polymorphism in the same cistron.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1974

References

Dickerson, R. E. (1971). The structure of cytochrome c and the rates of molecular evolution. Journal of Molecular Evolution 1, 2645.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ewens, W. J. (1969). Population Genetics. London: Methuen.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feller, W. (1966). An Introduction to Probability Theory and Its Applications, 3rd ed., vol. 1. Wiley.Google Scholar
Felsenstein, J. (1971). On the biological significance of the cost of gene substitutions. American Naturalist 105, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haigh, J. & Maynard Smith, J. (1972). Population size and protein variation in man. Genetical Research 19, 7389.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haldane, J. B. S. (1957). The cost of natural selection. Journal of Genetics 55, 511522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kimura, M. (1964). Diffusion models in population genetics. Journal of Applied Probability 1, 177232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kojima, K. I. & Scheffer, H. E. (1967). Survival process of linked mutant genes. Evolution 21, 518531.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewontin, R. C. (1973). The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change. (In the Press.)Google Scholar
Maynard Smith, J. (1968). ‘Haldane'dilemma’ and the rate of evolution. Nature 219, 11141116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sved, J. A. (1968). Possible rates of gene substitution in evolution. American Naturalist 102, 283292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The hitch-hiking effect of a favourable gene
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The hitch-hiking effect of a favourable gene
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The hitch-hiking effect of a favourable gene
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *