Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-rz424 Total loading time: 0.258 Render date: 2021-02-25T12:10:03.300Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The inbreeding decline and average dominance of genes affecting male life-history characters in Drosophila melanogaster

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Kimberly A. Hughes
Affiliation:
Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Summary

This paper describes the results of assays of male life-history characters in a large outbred laboratory population of D. melanogaster. Lines of flies homozygous for the entire third chromosome and lines of flies carrying two different third chromosomes were assayed for agespecific male mating ability (MMA), age-specific survivorship, male fertility, and body mass. The results of these assays were used to calculate the inbreeding decline associated with each of these traits, the average dominance of deleterious alleles that affect the traits, the genotypic and environmental components of variance for the homozygous lines, and phenotypic and genotypic correlations among the characters. Significant inbreeding decline was found for all characters except the Gompertz intercept and fertility. Early and late MMA show larger effects of inbreeding than any other trait. The inbreeding load for MMA is about the same magnitude as that for egg-to-adult viability, but is substantially less than that associated with total fitness. The estimated inbreeding decline and average dominance of male life-history characters are comparable to estimates for other Drosophila fitness components.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

References

Anderson, W. W., Levine, L., Olvera, O., Powell, J. R., Rosa, M. E. dela, Salceda, V. M., Gaso, M. I., & Guzman, J., (1979). Evidence for selection by male mating success in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 76, 15191523.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brittnacher, J. G., (1981). Genetic variation and genetic load due to the male reproductive component of fitness in Drosophila. Genetics 97, 719730.Google ScholarPubMed
Bundgaard, J., & Christiansen, F. B., (1972). Dynamics of polymorphism: I. Selection components in an experimental population of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 71, 439460.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, B., (1980). Evolution in Age-Structured Populations. Cambridge: U.K.: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, B., Lapid, A., & Canada, D., (1992). The distribution of transposable elements within and between chromosomes in a population of Drosophila melanogaster. II. Inferences on the nature of selection against elements. Genetical Research 60, 115130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Charlesworth, B., & Charlesworth, D., (1985). Genetic variation in recombination in Drosophila. I. Responses to selection and preliminary genetic analysis. Heredity 54, 7184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Charlesworth, D., & Charlesworth, B., (1987). Inbreeding depression and its evolutionary consequences. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 18, 237268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Comstock, R. E., & Robinson, H. F., (1952). Estimation of average dominance of genes. In Heterosis (ed. Gowen, J. W.), pp. 494516. Ames: Iowa State College Press.Google Scholar
Crow, J. F., & Kimura, M., (1970). An Introduction to Population Genetics Theory. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. R., (1868). Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication. London: John Murray.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. R., (1876). The Effects of Cross and Self fertilization in the Vegetable Kingdom. London: John Murray.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Engels, W. R., (1989). P elements in Drosophila. In Mobile DNA (ed. Berg, D. E. and Howe, M. M.), pp. 437484. Washington D.C.: American Society of Microbiology.Google Scholar
Falconer, D. S., (1989). Introduction to Quantitative Genetics. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Finch, C. E., (1990). Longevity, Senescence, and the Genome. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Finch, C. E., Pike, M. C., & Whitten, M., (1990). Slow increases of the Gompertz mortality rate during aging in certain animals approximate that of humans. Science 249, 902905.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greenberg, R., & Crow, J. F., (1960). A comparison of the effect of lethal and detrimental chromosomes from Drosophila populations. Genetics 45, 11531168.Google ScholarPubMed
Houle, D., (1992). Comparing evolvability and variability of quantitative traits. Genetics 130, 195204.Google ScholarPubMed
Hughes, K. A., & Charlesworth, B., (1993). A genetic analysis of senescence in Drosophila. Nature 367, 6467.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kempthorne, O., (1957). An Introduction to Genetic Statistics. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Kosuda, K., (1983). Genetic variability in mating activity of Drosophila melanogaster males. Experientia 39, 100101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindsley, D. L., & Zimm, G. G., (1992). The Genome of Drosophila melanogaster. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Miller, P., & Hedrick, P., (1993). Inbreeding and fitness in captive populations: lessons from Drosophila. Zoo Biology 12, 333351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morton, N. E., Crow, J. F., & Muller, H., (1956). An estimate of the mutational damage in man from data on consanguineous marriages. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 42, 855863.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mukai, T., Chigusa, S. I., Mettler, L. E., & Crow, J. F., (1972). Mutation rate and dominance of genes affecting viability in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 72,335–355.Google ScholarPubMed
Mukai, T., & Yamaguchi, O., (1974). The genetic structure of natural populations of Drosophila. Genetics 82, 6382.Google Scholar
Palmer, A. R., & Strobeck, C., (1986). Fluctuating asymmetry: measurement, analysis, patterns. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 17, 391421.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Partridge, L., Mackay, T. F. C., & Aitken, S., (1985). Male mating success and fertility in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetical Research, Cambridge 46, 279285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pendlebury, W. W., & Kidwell, J. F., (1974). The effect of inbreeding on male mating ability in Drosophila melanogaster. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 44, 128132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prout, T., (1971). The relation between fitness components and population prediction in Drosophila. I. The estimation of fitness components. Genetics 68, 127149.Google ScholarPubMed
Remington, R. D., & Schork, M. A., (1970). Statistics With Applications to the Biological and Health Sciences. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Rice, W. R., (1989). Analyzing tables of statistical tests. Evolution 43, 223225.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rose, M. R., (1991). The Evolutionary Biology of Aging. Oxford U.K.: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sharp, P. M., (1984). The effect of inbreeding on competitive male-mating ability in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 106, 601612.Google ScholarPubMed
Simmons, M. J., & Crow, J. F., (1977). Mutations affecting fitness in Drosophila populations. Annual Review of Genetics 11, 4978.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sokal, R. R., & Rohlf, F. J., (1981). Biometry. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman.Google Scholar
Sved, J. A., (1971). An estimate of heterosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetical Research, Cambridge 18, 97105.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Watanabe, T. K., Yamaguchi, O., & Mukai, T., (1976). The genetic variability of third chromosomes in a local population of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 89, 403417.Google Scholar
Wilkinson, G. S., (1987). Equilibrium analysis of sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster. Evolution 41, 1121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wright, S., (1977). Evolution and the Genetics of Populations, vol. 3, Experimental Results and Evolutionary Deductions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 56 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The inbreeding decline and average dominance of genes affecting male life-history characters in Drosophila melanogaster
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The inbreeding decline and average dominance of genes affecting male life-history characters in Drosophila melanogaster
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The inbreeding decline and average dominance of genes affecting male life-history characters in Drosophila melanogaster
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *