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Models of long-term artificial selection in finite population with recurrent mutation

  • William G. Hill (a1) and Jonathan Rasbash (a1)

Summary

The effects of mutation on mean and variance of response to selection for quantitative traits are investigated. The mutants are assumed to be unlinked, to be additive, and to have their effects symmetrically distributed about zero, with absolute values of effects having a gamma distribution. It is shown that the ratio of expected cumulative response to generation t from mutants, , and expected response over one generation from one generation of mutants, , is a function of t/N, where t is generations and N is effective population size. Similarly, , is a function of t/N, where is the increment in genetic variance from one generation of mutants. The mean and standard deviation of response from mutations relative to that from initial variation in the population, in the first generation, are functions of . Evaluation of these formulae for a range of parameters quantifies the important role that population size can play in response to long-term selection.

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Copyright

References

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