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A note on Fisher's ‘average effect’ and ‘average excess’

  • D. S. Falconer (a1)

Extract

The average effect and average excess of a gene substitution are formulated in terms of gene frequencies and inbreeding coefficient. This clarifies their meanings and shows how each is affected by non-random mating. The meanings of various definitions are examined, and one commonly used definition of average effect is found to be invalid with non-random mating. The concept of breeding value is shown to have no useful meaning when mating is not random.

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References

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Crow, J. F. & Kimura, M. (1970). An Introduction to Population Genetics Theory. New York: Harper & Row.
Edwards, A. W. F. (1977). Foundations of Mathematical Genetics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Edwards, A. W. F. (1982). Book review. Biometrics 38, 11281129.
Ewens, W. J. (1979). Mathematical Population Genetics. Berlin: Springer.
Falconer, D. S. (1981). Introduction to Quantitative Genetics. 2nd edn. London: Longman.
Fisher, R. A. (1930). The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Fisher, R. A. (1941). Average excess and average effect of a gene substitution. Annals of Eugenics 11, 5363.
Fisher, R. A. (1958). The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection. 2nd edn. New York: Dover.
Kempthorne, O. (1957). An Introduction to Genetic Statistics. New York: Wiley.
Kimura, M. (1958). On the change of population fitness by natural selection. Heredity 12, 145167.
Li, C. C. (1976). First Course in Population Genetics. Pacific Grove, California: Boxwood Press.
Price, G. R. (1972). Fisher's ‘fundamental theorem’ made clear. Annals of Human Genetics 36, 129140.

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