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Two-locus identity probabilities and identity disequilibrium in a partially selfing subdivided population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2001

RENAUD VITALIS
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Génétique et Environnement, C.C. 065, Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution de Montpellier, Université de Montpellier II, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France Station Biologique dé la Tour du Valat, Arles, France
DENIS COUVET
Affiliation:
CRBPO – Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France
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Abstract

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Measures of association of genes at different loci (linkage disequilibrium) are widely used to determine whether the structure of natural populations is clonal or not, to map genes from population data, or to test for the homogeneity of response of molecular markers to background selection, for example. However, the usual definitions of parameters for gametic associations may not be suitable for all these purposes. In this paper, we derive the recursion equations for one- and two-locus identity probabilities in an infinite island model. We study the role of drift, gene flow, partial selfing and mutation model on the expected association of genes across loci. We define the ‘within-subpopulation identity disequilibrium’ as the difference between the joint two-locus probability of identity in state and the expected product of one-locus identity probabilities. We evaluate this parameter as a function of recombination rate, effective size, gene flow and selfing rate. Within-subpopulation identity disequilibrium attains maximum values for intermediate immigration rates, whatever the selfing rate. Moreover, identity disequilibrium may be very small, even for high selfing rates. We discuss the implications of these findings for the analysis of data from natural populations.

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Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press
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