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Kant, cosmopolitanism and systems of constitutional justice in Europe and beyond

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2020

ALEC STONE SWEET*
Affiliation:
National University of Singapore, Faculty of Law, 469G Bukit Timah Rd, Singapore 259776
CLARE RYAN*
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center, 1 E Campus Dr, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States

Abstract

In A Cosmopolitan Legal Order: Kant, Constitutional Justice, and the ECHR, we sought to demonstrate the power of Kantian theory to explain – or at least meaningfully illuminate – (1) the defining characteristics of modern, rights-based constitutionalism; (2) the evolving law, politics and constitutional architecture of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR); and (3) the emergence of a global, cosmopolitan commons, featuring inter-judicial dialogue at its core. This article responds to contributors to the special symposium on the book. In Part I, we defend our account of a Kantian-congruent, domestic system of constitutional justice. Part II reflects on the ECHR as an instantiation of a cosmopolitan legal order, and on the European Court’s case law – particularly its enforcement of the proportionality principle. In Part III, we assess the evidence in support of a broader ‘constitutionalization’ of international human rights law.

Type
Symposium/Special Issue Manuscript
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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