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Study profile: the Durban Diabetes Study (DDS): a platform for chronic disease research

  • T. R. Hird (a1) (a2), E. H. Young (a1) (a2), F. J. Pirie (a3), J. Riha (a1) (a2), T. M. Esterhuizen (a4), B. O'Leary (a5), M. I. McCarthy (a6), M. S. Sandhu (a1) (a2) and A. A. Motala (a3)...
Abstract

The Durban Diabetes Study (DDS) is a population-based cross-sectional survey of an urban black population in the eThekwini Municipality (city of Durban) in South Africa. The survey combines health, lifestyle and socioeconomic questionnaire data with standardised biophysical measurements, biomarkers for non-communicable and infectious diseases, and genetic data. Data collection for the study is currently underway and the target sample size is 10 000 participants. The DDS has an established infrastructure for survey fieldwork, data collection and management, sample processing and storage, managed data sharing and consent for re-approaching participants, which can be utilised for further research studies. As such, the DDS represents a rich platform for investigating the distribution, interrelation and aetiology of chronic diseases and their risk factors, which is critical for developing health care policies for disease management and prevention. For data access enquiries please contact the African Partnership for Chronic Disease Research (APCDR) at data@apcdr.org or the corresponding author.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: M. S. Sandhu, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. (Email: ms23@sanger.ac.uk) and A. Motala, Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag 7, Congella 4013, South Africa. (Email: motala@ukzn.ac.za)
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Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics
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