Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ms7nj Total loading time: 0.214 Render date: 2022-08-14T09:42:48.168Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Editorial: Developing the Rule of Law in East Asia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2013

Extract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

This special issue results from a conference called ‘The State in Asia’, which was held in Leiden from 17-19 December 2012. The overall theme of the conference was the development of modern states in Asia, conceptualised as ‘ongoing projects informed by a quest for cultural, religious and political identities that are new and modern, yet simultaneously rooted in indigenous culture and tradition’. The formation and the functioning of Asia's systems of law and governance reflect strong developmental ambitions as well as deep heterogeneity and insecurity. In the East Asian context Japan, Singapore, and South Korea now serve as models of successful nation-states that other states in the region aspire to emulate, but in most countries in the region endemic corruption and factionalism make rule anything but stable and predictable.

The panel on ‘Developing the Rule of Law’ looked at the attempts to realise different aspects or elements of the rule of law in East Asia. In this effort East Asian states have borrowed paradigms, ideas and laws from elsewhere which may take on quite different meanings in their new surroundings. Regional models, have become more important than they were in the past, but ideas are adopted from all over the world. The rise of ‘alternative’ global and regional legal regimes has reinforced this process and led to a situation where states may choose to model their laws and legal institutions from a much broader range of examples than in the past.

Type
Editorial
Copyright
Copyright © T.M.C. Asser Press and the Authors 2013 
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Editorial: Developing the Rule of Law in East Asia
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Editorial: Developing the Rule of Law in East Asia
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Editorial: Developing the Rule of Law in East Asia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *