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A Method for Capturing Context in the Assessment of Leaders: The “Too Little/Too Much” Rating Scale

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 December 2018

Jasmine Vergauwe*
Affiliation:
Department of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology, Ghent University
Robert B. Kaiser
Affiliation:
Kaiser Leadership Solutions
Bart Wille
Affiliation:
Department of Personnel Management, Work and Organizational Psychology, Ghent University
Filip De Fruyt
Affiliation:
Department of Personnel Management, Work and Organizational Psychology, Ghent University
Joeri Hofmans
Affiliation:
Research Group of Work and Organizational Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jasmine Vergauwe, Department of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. E-mail: Jasmine.Vergauwe@ugent.be

Extract

In their focal article, Reynolds, McCauley, Tsacoumis, and the Jeanneret Symposium Participants (2018) stress the importance of context in leadership assessment. For instance, they argue that senior executives work in a different context compared to lower-level managers and that this should be taken into account. A simple example is that the competency of strategic thinking is critical for executive performance but much less so, if at all, for front-line supervisors. The claim that context matters in leadership and in the assessment of leaders is easy to grasp but difficult to apply in practice.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2018 

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