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Don't Forget To Properly Use Your Signal: Driving Down New Roads to Selection Decisions

  • Ryan G. Horn (a1), Samuel E. Kaminsky (a2) and Tara S. Behrend (a1)

Extract

Chamorro-Premuzic, Winsborough, Sherman, and Hogan (2016) note that new talent signals recently adopted by organizations are related to older selection and assessment methods. Drawing this connection between old and new technologies is helpful; however, viewing new technology as either shiny new objects or a brave new world creates a false dichotomy. Recent technology-enhanced human resources (HR) processes like the widespread use of gamified practices and video-recorded interviewing are not just fads or the beginning of a transformation in HR but rather natural evolutions of methods that differ across specific dimensions that can be identified and measured. It is important to view these recent advances as extensions of the existing methods. That is, we need to focus on how these new methods are different and not on that they are different.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Ryan G. Horn, Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, The George Washington University, 600 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052. E-mail: ryanhorn@gwu.edu

References

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Don't Forget To Properly Use Your Signal: Driving Down New Roads to Selection Decisions

  • Ryan G. Horn (a1), Samuel E. Kaminsky (a2) and Tara S. Behrend (a1)

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