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Copper Continuously Limits the Concentration of Bacteria Resident on Bed Rails within the Intensive Care Unit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Michael G. Schmidt*
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
Hubert H. Attaway III
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
Sarah E. Fairey
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
Lisa L. Steed
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
Harold T. Michels
Affiliation:
Copper Development Association, New York, New York
Cassandra D. Salgado
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
*
Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 173 Ashley Avenue, BSB 319G, Charleston, SC 29425 (schmidtm@musc.edu)

Abstract

Cleaning is an effective way to lower the bacterial burden (BB) on surfaces and minimize the infection risk to patients. However, BB can quickly return. Copper, when used to surface hospital bed rails, was found to consistently limit surface BB before and after cleaning through its continuous antimicrobial activity.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

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References

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