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Lessons Learned From Hospital Ebola Preparation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2015

Daniel J. Morgan*
Affiliation:
Veterans Affairs Maryland Healthcare System, Baltimore, Maryland University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Barbara Braun
Affiliation:
The Joint Commission, Chicago, Illinois
Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Deverick Anderson
Affiliation:
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
Ebbing Lautenbach
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Nasia Safdar
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Marci Drees
Affiliation:
Christiana Hospital, Wilmington, Delaware
Jennifer Meddings
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Darren R. Linkin
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Lindsay D. Croft
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa Pineles
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Daniel J. Diekema
Affiliation:
University of Iowa School of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
Anthony D. Harris
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
*
Address correspondence to Daniel J. Morgan, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 S. Pine Street, MSTF 334, Baltimore, MD (dmorgan@epi.umaryland.edu).

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hospital Ebola preparation is underway in the United States and other countries; however, the best approach and resources involved are unknown.

OBJECTIVE

To examine costs and challenges associated with hospital Ebola preparation by means of a survey of Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) members.

DESIGN

Electronic survey of infection prevention experts.

RESULTS

A total of 257 members completed the survey (221 US, 36 international) representing institutions in 41 US states, the District of Columbia, and 18 countries. The 221 US respondents represented 158 (43.1%) of 367 major medical centers that have SHEA members and included 21 (60%) of 35 institutions recently defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as Ebola virus disease treatment centers. From October 13 through October 19, 2014, Ebola consumed 80% of hospital epidemiology time and only 30% of routine infection prevention activities were completed. Routine care was delayed in 27% of hospitals evaluating patients for Ebola.

LIMITATIONS

Convenience sample of SHEA members with a moderate response rate.

CONCLUSIONS

Hospital Ebola preparations required extraordinary resources, which were diverted from routine infection prevention activities. Patients being evaluated for Ebola faced delays and potential limitations in management of other diseases that are more common in travelers returning from West Africa.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0): 1–5

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

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