Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-wr4x4 Total loading time: 0.426 Render date: 2023-01-30T06:09:58.242Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in children with cerebral palsy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 June 2022

Diego Schaps
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
Reilly Dever
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Victoria M. Parente
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina
Deverick J. Anderson
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Ibukunoluwa C. Kalu*
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Dr Ibukunoluwa C. Kalu, E-mail: ica5@duke.edu

Abstract

A retrospective cohort of children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with cerebral palsy was matched 1:3 by age and admission year to determine odds of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization. Adjusted odds of MRSA nasal colonization at PICU admission were 2.6-fold higher among children with cerebral palsy.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Zervou, FN, Zacharioudakis, IM, Ziakas, PD, Mylonakis, E. MRSA colonization and risk of infection in the neonatal and pediatric ICU: a meta-analysis. Pediatrics 2014;133:e1015e1023.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Milstone, AM, Carroll, KC, Ross, T, et al. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in pediatric intensive care unit. Emerg Infect Dis 2010;16:647655.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Geva, A, Wright, SB, Baldini, LM, et al. Spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a large tertiary NICU: network analysis. Pediatrics 2011;128:e1173e1180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kalra, L, Camacho, F, Whitener, CJ, et al. Risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection in patients with nasal MRSA colonization. Am J Infect Control 2013;41:12531257.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mainie, I, Loughrey, A, Watson, J, Tham, TC. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy sites infected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: impact on outcome. J Clin Gastroenterol 2006;40:297300.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sullivan, BT, Abousamra, O, Puvanesarajah, V, et al. Deep infections after pediatric spinal arthrodesis: differences exist with idiopathic, neuromuscular, or genetic and syndromic cause of deformity. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2019;101:22192225.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schaps, D, Leraas, HJ, Rice, HE, Tracy, ET. Surgical site infection in children with neuromuscular disorders after laparoscopic gastrostomy: a propensity-matched NSQIP-P analysis. Surg Infect 2022;23:226231.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huang, SS, Singh, R, McKinnell, JA, et al. Decolonization to reduce postdischarge infection risk among MRSA carriers. N Engl J Med 2019;380:638650.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Horvath, MM, Rusincovitch, SA, Brinson, S, Shang, HC, Evans, S, Ferranti, JM. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). J Biomed Inform 2014;52:231242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organization. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Second Edition. Geneva: WHO; 2004.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in children with cerebral palsy
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in children with cerebral palsy
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in children with cerebral palsy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *