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A Neonatal Specialist With Recurrent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Carriage Implicated in the Transmission of MRSA to Newborns

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

M. Méan
Affiliation:
Unité d'hygiène hospitalière, Département de veille sanitaire, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
M. R. Mallaret
Affiliation:
Unité d'hygiène hospitalière, Département de veille sanitaire, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
P Andrini
Affiliation:
Département de pédiatrie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
C. Recule
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de bactériologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
T. Debillon
Affiliation:
Département de pédiatrie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
P. Pavese
Affiliation:
Service de maladies infectieuses, Département de médecine aiguë et spécialisée, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
J. Croizé
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de bactériologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble (38) Cedex 9
Corresponding

Abstract

This study reports an investigation of outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and colonization involving 17 newborns in the neonatal unit of a teaching hospital. A neonatal specialist colonized with MRSA that eventually became mupirocin-resistant was implicated as a recurrent source of transmission of MRSA to newborns.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2007

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References

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A Neonatal Specialist With Recurrent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Carriage Implicated in the Transmission of MRSA to Newborns
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