Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5bf98f6d76-jhk7w Total loading time: 11.091 Render date: 2021-04-21T09:13:43.995Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Terminal Decontamination of Patient Rooms Using an Automated Mobile UV Light Unit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

John M. Boyce
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Hospital of Saint Raphael, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Nancy L. Havill
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Hospital of Saint Raphael, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Brent A. Moore
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective.

To determine the ability of a mobile UV light unit to reduce bacterial contamination of environmental surfaces in patient rooms.

Methods.

An automated mobile UV light unit that emits UV-C light was placed in 25 patient rooms after patient discharge and operated using a 1- or 2-stage procedure. Aerobic colony counts were calculated for each of 5 standardized high-touch surfaces in the rooms before and after UV light decontamination (UVLD). Clostridium difficile spore log reductions achieved were determined using a modification of the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) International E2197 quantitative disk carrier test method. In-room ozone concentrations during UVLD were measured.

Results.

For the 1-stage procedure, mean aerobic colony counts for the 5 high-touch surfaces ranged from 10.6 to 98.2 colony-forming units (CFUs) per Dey/Engley (D/E) plate before UVLD and from 0.3 to 24.0 CFUs per D/E plate after UVLD, with significant reductions for all 5 surfaces (all P<.02). Surfaces in direct line of sight were significantly more likely to yield negative culture results after UVLD than before UVLD (all P<.001). Mean C. difficile spore log reductions ranged from 1.8 to 2.9. UVLD cycle times ranged from 34.2 to 100.1 minutes. For the 2-stage procedure, mean aerobic colony counts ranged from 10.0 to 89.2 CFUs per D/E plate before UVLD and were 0 CFUs per D/E plate after UVLD, with significant reductions for all 5 high-touch surfaces. UVLD cycle times ranged from 72.1 to 146.3 minutes. In-room ozone concentrations during UVLD ranged from undetectable to 0.012 ppm.

Conclusions.

The mobile UV-C light unit significantly reduced aerobic colony counts and C. difficile spores on contaminated surfaces in patient rooms.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.Weber, DJ, Rutala, WA, Miller, MB, Huslage, K, Sickbert-Bennett, E. Role of hospital surfaces in the transmission of emerging health care-associated pathogens: norovirus, Clostridium difficile, and Acinetobacter species. Am J Infect Control 2010;38(suppl):S25S33.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Sehulster, L, Chinn, RY, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guidelines for environmental infection control in healthcare facilities: recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). MMWR Recomm Rep 2003;52(RR-10):142.Google Scholar
3.Rutala, WA, Weber, DJ, Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for disinfection and sterilization in healthcare facilities, 2008. http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/guidelines/Disinfection_Nov_2008.pdf. Accessed June 22, 2011.Google Scholar
4.Dancer, SJ. The role of environmental cleaning in the control of hospital-acquired infection. J Hosp Infect 2009;73:378385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Carling, PC, Briggs, JL, Perkins, J, Highlander, D. Improved cleaning of patient rooms using a new targeting method. Clin Infect Dis 2006;42:385388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.Carling, PC, Parry, MF, Von Beheren, SM; for the Healthcare Environmental Hygiene Study Group. Identifying opportunities to enhance environmental cleaning in 23 acute care hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Griffith, CJ, Obee, P, Cooper, RA, Burton, NF, Lewis, M. The effectiveness of existing and modified cleaning regimens in a Welsh hospital. J Hosp Infect 2007;66:352359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Dancer, SJ, White, L, Robertson, C. Monitoring environmental cleanliness on two surgical wards. Int J Environ Health Res 2008;18:357364.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9.Boyce, JM, Havill, NL, Dumigan, DG, Golebiewski, M, Balogun, O, Rizvani, R. Monitoring the effectiveness of hospital cleaning practices by use of an adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2009;30:678684.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Nerandzic, MM, Cadnum, JL, Pultz, MJ, Donskey, CJ. Evaluation of an automated ultraviolet radiation device for decontamination of Clostridium difficile and other healthcare-associated pathogens in hospital rooms. BMC Infect Dis 2010;10:197.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Rutala, WA, Gergen, MF, Weber, DJ. Room decontamination with UV radiation. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:10251029.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12.ASTM International. Standard Quantitative Disk Carrier Test Method for Determining the Bactericidal, Virucidal, Fungicidal, Mycobacterial and Sporicidal Activities of Liquid Chemical Germicides. West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM International, 2007.Google Scholar
13.Otter, JA, French, GL. Survival of nosocomial bacteria and spores on surfaces and inactivation by hydrogen peroxide vapour. J Clin Microbiol 2009;47:205207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Sethi, AK, Al-Nassir, WN, Nernandzic, MM, Donskey, CJ. Skin and environmental contamination with vancomycin-resistant enterococci in patients receiving oral metronidazole or oral vancomycin treatment for Clostridium difficile–associated disease. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2009;30:1317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Bobulsky, GS, Al-Nassir, WN, Riggs, MM, Sethi, AK, Donskey, CJ. Clostridium difficile skin contamination in patients with C. difficile–associated disease. Clin Infect Dis 2008;46:447450.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16.Kramer, A, Schwebke, I, Kampf, G. How long do nosocomial pathogens persist on inanimate surfaces? a systematic review. BMC Infect Dis 2006;6:130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Martínez, JA, Ruthazer, R, Hansjosten, K, Barefoot, L, Snydman, DR. Role of environmental contamination as a risk factor for acquisition of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in patients treated in a medical intensive care unit. Arch Intern Med 2003;163:19051912.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Huang, SS, Datta, R, Platt, R. Risk of acquiring antibiotic-resistant bacteria from prior room occupants. Arch Intern Med 2006;166:19451951.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
19.Drees, M, Snydman, DR, Schmid, CH, et al.Prior environmental contamination increases the risk of acquisition of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Clin Infect Dis 2008;46:678685.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.Shaughnessy, M, Micielli, R, Depestel, D, et al.Evaluation of hospital room assignment and acquisition of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea. Paper presented at: 48th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; October 2008; Washington, DC. Abstract K-4194.Google Scholar
21.Mulligan, ME, George, WL, Rolfe, RD, Finegold, SM. Epidemiological aspects of Clostridium difficile–induced diarrhea and colitis. Am J Clin Nutr 1980;33:25332538.Google Scholar
22.Kim, KH, Fekety, R, Batts, DH, et al.Isolation of Clostridium difficile from the environment and contacts of patients with antibioitic-associated colitis. J Infect Dis 1981;143:4250.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23.Kaatz, GW, Gitlin, SD, Schaberg, DR, et al.Acquisition of Clostridium difficile from the hospital environment. Am J Epidemiol 1988;127:12891294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24.Boyce, JM, Havill, NL, Otter, JA, et al.Impact of hydrogen peroxide vapor room decontamination on Clostridium difficile environmental contamination and transmission in a healthcare setting. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:723729.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 97 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Terminal Decontamination of Patient Rooms Using an Automated Mobile UV Light Unit
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Terminal Decontamination of Patient Rooms Using an Automated Mobile UV Light Unit
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Terminal Decontamination of Patient Rooms Using an Automated Mobile UV Light Unit
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *