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Use of diagnostic stewardship practices to improve urine culturing among SHEA Research Network hospitals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2018

Kaede V. Sullivan*
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Daniel J. Morgan
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Veterans Affairs Maryland Healthcare System, Baltimore, Maryland
Surbhi Leekha
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
*
Author for correspondence: Kaede V. Sullivan, Temple University Hospital, 3401 Broad St, Room A2 F329, Philadelphia, PA 19140. E-mail: kaede.ota@tuhs.temple.edu

Abstract

This survey investigated interventions used by acute-care hospitals to reduce the detection of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Half of the respondents reported using reflex urine cultures but with varied urinalysis criteria and perceived outcomes. Other diagnostic stewardship interventions for urine culture ordering and specimen quality were less common.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Sullivan KV, et al. (2019). Use of diagnostic stewardship practices to improve urine culturing among SHEA Research Network hospitals. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2019, 40, 228–231. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.325

References

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