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Central venous catheter–related bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: Comparison of data from a clinical registry and a randomized controlled trial

  • Enrico Schalk (a1), Daniel Teschner (a2), Marcus Hentrich (a3), Boris Böll (a4), Jens Panse (a5), Martin Schmidt-Hieber (a6), Maria J.G.T. Vehreschild (a4) (a7) (a8) and Lena M. Biehl (a4) (a7)...
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      Central venous catheter–related bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: Comparison of data from a clinical registry and a randomized controlled trial
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      Central venous catheter–related bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: Comparison of data from a clinical registry and a randomized controlled trial
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Enrico Schalk, E-mail: enrico.schalk@med.ovgu.de

References

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1.Magill, SS, O’Leary, E, Janelle, SJ, et al.Changes in prevalence of healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. N Engl J Med 2018;379:17321744.
2.Battaglia, CC, Hale, K. Hospital-acquired infections in critically ill patients with cancer. J Intensive Care Med 2019;34:523536.
3.Hallam, C, Jackson, T, Rajgopal, A, Russell, B. Establishing catheter-related bloodstream infection surveillance to drive improvement. J Infect Prev 2018;19:160166.
4.Surveillance of nosocomial infections as well as the detection of pathogens with special resistance and multi-resistance [in German]. Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz 2013;56:580583.
5.Parienti, JJ, Mongardon, N, Mégarbane, B, et al.Intravascular complications of central venous catheterization by insertion site. N Engl J Med 2015;373:12201229.
6.Biehl, LM, Huth, A, Panse, J, et al.A randomized trial on chlorhexidine dressings for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neutropenic patients. Ann Oncol 2016;27:19161922.
7.Hentrich, M, Schalk, E, Schmidt-Hieber, M, et al.Central venous catheter-related infections in hematology and oncology: 2012 updated guidelines on diagnosis, management and prevention by the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology. Ann Oncol 2014;25:936947.
8.Frieden, TR. Evidence for health decision making—beyond randomized, controlled trials. N Engl J Med 2017;377:465475.
9.Schalk, E, Hanus, L, Färber, J, Fischer, T, Heidel, FH. Prediction of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified Infection Probability Score (mIPS). Ann Hematol 2015;94:14511456.
10.Schalk, E, Toelle, D, Schulz, S, et al. Identifying haematological cancer patients with high risk for central venous catheter (CVC)-related bloodstream infections at the time point of CVC insertion (abstract P2556). Presented at the 29th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, April 13–16, 2019, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
11.Wolf, HH, Leithauser, M, Maschmeyer, G, et al.Central venous catheter-related infections in hematology and oncology: guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO). Ann Hematol 2008;87:863876.

Central venous catheter–related bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: Comparison of data from a clinical registry and a randomized controlled trial

  • Enrico Schalk (a1), Daniel Teschner (a2), Marcus Hentrich (a3), Boris Böll (a4), Jens Panse (a5), Martin Schmidt-Hieber (a6), Maria J.G.T. Vehreschild (a4) (a7) (a8) and Lena M. Biehl (a4) (a7)...

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