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Disinfection and Sterilization of Prion-Contaminated Medical Instruments

  • Ermias D. Belay (a1), Lawrence B. Schonberger (a1), Paul Brown (a2), Suzette A. Priola (a3), Bruce Chesebro (a3), Robert G. Will (a4) and David M. Asher (a5)...
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
MD, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia30333, (EBelay@cdc.gov)
References
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1.Rutala WA, Weber DJ. Guideline for disinfection and sterilization of prion-contaminated medical instruments. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:107117.
2.World Health Organization (WHO). Infection control guidelines for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; 2000. http://www.who.mt/csr/resources/publications/bse/whocdscsraph2003.pdf. Accessed March 24, 2010.
3.Yan ZX, Stitz L, Heeg P, Pfaff E, Roth K. Infectivity of prion protein bound to stainless steel wires: a model for testing decontamination procedures for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:280283.
4.Jackson GS, McKintosh E, Flechsig E, et al. An enzyme-detergent method for effective prion decontamination of surgical steel. J Gen Virol 2005;86(pt 3):869878.
5.Pomeroy K, Brown S, Woods T, Asher D. Decontamination of surfaces exposed to the infectious agents of TSEs. Paper presented at: Prion 2009; September 2009; Thessaloniki-Chalkidiki, Greece. Abstract P.2.39; p 81.
6.Keeler N, Schonberger LB, Belay ED, Sehulster L, Turabelidze G, Sejvar JJ. Investigation of a possible iatrogenic case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease after a neurosurgical procedure. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2006;27:13521357.
7.Stricof RL, Lillquist PP, Thomas N, Belay ED, Schonberger LB, Morse DL. An investigation of potential neurosurgical transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: challenges and lessons learned. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2006;27:302304.
8.Peretz D, Supattapone S, Giles K, et al. Inactivation of prions by acidic sodium dodecyl sulfate. J Virol 2006;80:322331.
9.Brown P, Rau EH, Lemieux P, Johnson BK, Bacote AE, Gajdusek DC. Infectivity studies of both ash and air emissions from simulated incineration of scrapie-contaminated tissues. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:61556160.
10.Taylor DM. Preventing accidental transmission of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Br Med Bull 2003;66:293303.
11.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Infection control practices: CJD (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, classic), http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/cjd/qa_cjd_infection_control.htm
12.World Health Organization (WHO). Guidelines on tissue infectivity distribution in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; 2006. http://www.who.int/bloodproducts/TSEREPORT-LoRes.pdf. Accessed March 24, 2010.
13.World Health Organization. WHO tables on tissue infectivity distribution in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, http://www.who.int/bloodproducts/tablestissueinfectivity.pdf. Accessed October 18, 2010.
14.Brown SA, Merritt K. Use of containment pans and lids for autoclaving caustic solutions. Amer J Infect Control 2003;31(4):257260.
15.Brown SA, Merritt K, Woods TO, Busick DN. Effects on instruments of the World Health Organization–recommended protocols for decontamination after possible exposure to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy–contaminated tissue. J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2005;72(1):186190.
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Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
  • URL: /core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology
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