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Increased Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates After the Introduction of a New Mechanical Valve Intravenous Access Port

  • Lisa L. Maragakis (a1) (a2), Karen L. Bradley (a1), Xiaoyan Song (a1) (a2), Claire Beers (a3), Marlene R. Miller (a4) (a5), Sara E. Cosgrove (a1) (a2) and Trish M. Perl (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

The technology of intravenous catheter access ports has evolved from open ports covered by removable caps to more-sophisticated, closed versions containing mechanical valves. We report a significant increase in catheter-related bloodstream infections after the introduction of a new needle-free positive-pressure mechanical valve intravenous access port at our institution.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 600 North Wolfe Street, Osier 425, Baltimore, MD 21287 (lmaragal@jhmi.edu)

References

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1.Bouza, E, Munoz, P, Lopez-Rodriguez, J, et al. A needleless closed system device (CLAVE) protects from intravascular catheter tip and hub colonization: a prospective randomized study. J Hosp Infect 2003; 54:279287.
2.Yébenes, JC, Martínez, R, Serra-Prat, M, et al. Resistance to the migration of microorganisms of a needle-free disinfectable connector. Am J Infect Control 2003;31:462464.
3.Yébenes, JC, Vidaur, L, Serra-Prat, M, et al. Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection in critically ill patients using a disinfectable, needle-free connector: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Infect Control 2004; 32:291295.
4.Hall, K, Geffers, C, Giannetta, E, et al. Outbreak of bloodstream infections temporally associated with a new needleless I.V. infusion system. In: Program and abstracts of the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America; April 19, 2004; Philadelphia. Abstract 285.
5.Institute for Healthcare Improvement. The 100,000 Lives Campaign. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Available at http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/Campaign/. Accessed December 9, 2005.

Increased Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates After the Introduction of a New Mechanical Valve Intravenous Access Port

  • Lisa L. Maragakis (a1) (a2), Karen L. Bradley (a1), Xiaoyan Song (a1) (a2), Claire Beers (a3), Marlene R. Miller (a4) (a5), Sara E. Cosgrove (a1) (a2) and Trish M. Perl (a1) (a2)...

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