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Maintaining the Momentum of Change: The Role of the 2014 Updates to the Compendium in Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2016

Edward Septimus
Affiliation:
Hospital Corporation of America, Houston, Texas
Deborah S. Yokoe
Affiliation:
Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Robert A. Weinstein
Affiliation:
Stroger Hospital and Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
Trish M. Perl
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa L. Maragakis
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Sean M. Berenholtz
Affiliation:
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
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Abstract

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Preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) is a national priority. Although substantial progress has been achieved, considerable deficiencies remain in our ability to efficiently and effectively translate existing knowledge about HAI prevention into reliable, sustainable, widespread practice. “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates” is the product of a highly collaborative endeavor designed to support hospitals’ efforts to implement and sustain HAI prevention strategies.

Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2014

References

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