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Outbreak Response and Incident Management: SHEA Guidance and Resources for Healthcare Epidemiologists in United States Acute-Care Hospitals

  • David B. Banach (a1), B. Lynn Johnston (a2), Duha Al-Zubeidi (a3), Allison H. Bartlett (a4), Susan Casey Bleasdale (a5), Valerie M. Deloney (a6), Kyle B. Enfield (a7), Judith A. Guzman-Cottrill (a8), Christopher Lowe (a9), Luis Ostrosky-Zeichner (a10), Kyle J. Popovich (a11), Payal K. Patel (a12), Karen Ravin (a13), Theresa Rowe (a14), Erica S. Shenoy (a15), Roger Stienecker (a16), Pritish K. Tosh (a17), Kavita K. Trivedi (a18) and the Outbreak Response Training Program (ORTP) Advisory Panel...
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Abstract
Copyright
Corresponding author
Address correspondence to David B. Banach, MD, MPH, MS, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Ave, Farmington, CT 06030 (dbanach@uchc.edu).
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a

Co-chairs.

b

Members of the Outbreak Response Training Program (ORTP) Advisory Panel (in alphabetical order): Muhammad S. Ashraf, MBBS, Omaha, NE; E. Yoko Furuya, MD, MS, New York, NY;  Judith A. Guzman-Cottrill, DO (Chair of ORTP Advisory Panel), Portland, OR; Susy Hota, MD, MSc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Nicole Iovine, MD, Gainesville, FL; Jesse T. Jacob, MD, MSc, Atlanta, GA; Amy B. Kressel, MD, MS, Indianapolis, IN; Larissa May, MD, MSPH, MSHS, Sacramento, CA; Rekha Murthy, MD, Los Angeles, CA;  Ann-Christine Nyquist, MD, Aurora, CO; Belinda Ostrowsky, MD, MPH, Bronx, NY; Nasia Safdar, MD, PhD, Madison, WI; and Heather Young, PhD, MPHDenver, CO.

Footnotes
References
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