Skip to main content
×
Home

Raising the Bar: The Need for Standardizing the Use of “Standard Precautions” as a Primary Intervention to Prevent Occupational Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens

  • David K. Henderson (a1)
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Raising the Bar: The Need for Standardizing the Use of “Standard Precautions” as a Primary Intervention to Prevent Occupational Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Raising the Bar: The Need for Standardizing the Use of “Standard Precautions” as a Primary Intervention to Prevent Occupational Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Raising the Bar: The Need for Standardizing the Use of “Standard Precautions” as a Primary Intervention to Prevent Occupational Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens
      Available formats
      ×
Abstract
Copyright
Corresponding author
National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 2C146, 9000 Rockville Pk, Bethesda, MD 20892
References
Hide All
1.Department of Labor. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens; final rule. Federal Register 1991;56:64175–182.
2.Henderson DK. HIV postexposure prophylaxis in the 21st century. Emerg Infect Dis. In press.
3.Henderson DK. Postexposure chemoprophylaxis for occupational exposures to the human immunodeficiency virus. JAMA 1999;281:931936.
4.Fahey BJ, Koziol DE, Banks SM, Henderson DK. Frequency of nonparenteral occupational exposures to blood and body fluids before and after Universal Precautions training. Am J Med 1991;90:145153.
5.Haiduven DJ, DeMaio TM, Stevens DA. A five-year study of needlestick injuries: significant reduction associated with communication, education, and convenient placement of sharps containers. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1992;13:265271.
6.Beekmann SE, Vlahov D, Koziol DE, McShalley ED, Schmitt JM, Henderson DK. Temporal association between implementation of Universal Precautions and a sustained, progressive decrease in percutaneous exposures to blood. Clin Infect Dis 1994;18:562569.
7.Beekmann SE, Vaughn TE, McCoy KD, Ferguson KJ, Torner JC, Woolson RF, et al. Hospital bloodborne pathogens programs: program characteristics and blood and body fluid exposure rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2001;22:7382.
8.Ben-David B, Gaitini L. The routine wearing of gloves: impact on the frequency of needlestick and percutaneous injury and on surface contamination in the operating room. Anesth Analg 1996;83:623628.
9.Courington KR, Patterson SL, Howard RJ. Universal precautions are not universally followed. Arch Surg 1991;126:9396.
10.DeJoy DM, Gershon RR, Murphy LR, Wilson MG. A work-systems analysis of compliance with Universal Precautions among health care workers. Health Educ Q 1996;23:159174.
11.Gerberding JL, Lewis FR JrSchecter WP. Are Universal Precautions realistic? Surg Clin North Am 1995;75:10911104.
12.Gershon R. Facilitator report: bloodborne pathogens exposure among health care workers. Am J Ind Med 1996;29:418420.
13.Hammond JS, Eckes JM, Gomez GA, Cunningham DN. HIV, trauma, and infection control: Universal Precautions are universally ignored. J Trauma 1990;30:555558.
14.Michalsen A, Delclos GL, Felknor SA, Davidson AL, Johnson PC, Vesley D, et al. Compliance with Universal Precautions among physicians. J Occup Environ Med 1997;39:130137.
15.Saghafi L, Raselli P, Francillon C, Francioli P. Exposure to blood during various procedures: results of two surveys before and after the implementation of Universal Precautions. Am J Infect Control 1992;20:5357.
16.Roy E, Robillard P. Effectiveness of and compliance to preventive measures against the occupational transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Scand J Work Environ Health 1994;20:393400.
17.Williams CO, Campbell S, Henry K, Collier P. Variables influencing worker compliance with Universal Precautions in the emergency department. Am J Infect Control 1994;22:138148.
18.Schillo BA, Reischl TM. HIV-related knowledge and precautions among Michigan nurses. Am J Public Health 1993;83:14381442.
19.Jeffe DB, Mutha S, L'Ecuyer PB, Kim LE, Singal RB, Evanoff BA, et al. Healthcare workers' attitudes and compliance with Universal Precautions: gender, occupation, and specialty differences. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1997;18:710712.
20.Friedland LR, Joffe M, Wiley JF 2dSchapire A, Moore DF. Effect of educational program on compliance with glove use in a pediatric emergency department. Am J Dis Child 1992;146:13551358.
21.Moore S, Goodwin H, Grossberg R, Toltzis P. Compliance with Universal Precautions among pediatric residents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1998;152:554557.
22.Eustis TC, Wright SW, Wrenn KD, Fowlie EJ, Slovis CM. Compliance with recommendations for Universal Precautions among prehospital providers. Ann Emerg Med 1995;25:512515.
23.Willy ME, Dhillon G, Loewen NL, Wesley RA, Henderson DK. Adverse exposures and Universal Precautions practices among a group of highly exposed health professionals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1990;11:351356.
24.Waddell C. Perception of HIV risk and reported compliance with Universal Precautions: a comparison of Australian dental hygienists and dentists. J Dent Hyg 1997;71:1721.
25.Rabaud C, Zanea A, Mur JM, Blech MF, Dazy D, May T, et al. Occupational exposure to blood: search for a relation between personality and behavior. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2000;21:564574.
26.Henderson DK, Lee LM, Kawana R, Fahey BJ, Wesley R, Schmitt JM. Occupational bloodborne pathogen exposures: 12 years' experience and comparison with four teaching hospital in Japan. In: Program and Abstracts from the 38th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America; 2000; New Orleans, LA: Infectious Diseases Society of America; 2000; Abstract 405.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
  • URL: /core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 29 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 26 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.