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Reducing urinary catheter use using an electronic reminder system in hospitalized patients: A randomized stepped-wedge trial

  • Brett G. Mitchell (a1) (a2), Maria Northcote (a3), Allen C. Cheng (a4) (a5), Oyebola Fasugba (a6) (a7), Philip L. Russo (a7) (a8) (a9) and Hannah Rosebrock (a7)...
Abstract
Objective:

To determine the effectiveness and ease of use of an electronic reminder device in reducing urinary catheterization duration.

Design:

A randomized controlled trial with a cross-sectional anonymous online survey and focus group.

Setting:

Ten wards in an Australian hospital.

Participants:

All hospitalized patients with a urinary catheter.

Intervention:

An electronic reminder system, the CATH TAG, applied to urinary catheter bags to prompt removal of urinary catheters.

Outcomes:

Catheterization duration and perceptions of nurses about the ease of use.

Methods:

A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the rate of removal of catheters. A phenomenological approach underpinned data collection and analysis methods associated with the focus group.

Results:

In total, 1,167 patients with a urinary catheter were included. The mean durations in control and intervention phases were 5.51 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9–6.2) and 5.08 days (95% CI, 4.6–5.6), respectively. For patients who had a CATH TAG applied, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.91–1.14; P = .75). A subgroup analysis excluded patients in an intensive care unit (ICU), and the use of the CATH TAG was associated with a 23% decrease in the mean, from 5.00 days (95% CI, 4.44–5.56) to 3.84 days (95% CI, 3.47–4.21). Overall, 82 nurses completed a survey and 5 nurses participated in a focus group. Responses regarding the device were largely positive, and benefits for patient care were identified.

Conclusion:

The CATH TAG did not reduce the duration of catheterization, but potential benefits in patients outside the ICU were identified. Electronic reminders may be useful to aid prompt removal of urinary catheters in the non-ICU hospital setting.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Author for correspondence: Brett G. Mitchell, Email: brett.mitchell@avondale.edu.au
References
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3.Fasugba, O, Cheng, AC, Russo, PL, Northcote, M, Rosebrock, H, Mitchell, BG. Reducing urinary catheter use: a protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an electronic reminder system in hospitalised patients in Australia. BMJ Open 2018;8:e020469.
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12.Gross, PA, Patel, B. Reducing antibiotic overuse: a call for a national performance measure for not treating asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clin Infect Dis 2007;45:13351337.
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Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
  • URL: /core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology
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