Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Sustained Infection Reduction in Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers Participating in a Collaborative Bloodstream Infection Prevention Effort

  • Sarah H. Yi (a1), Alexander J. Kallen (a1), Sally Hess (a2), Virginia R. Bren (a3), Mary E. Lincoln (a4), Gemma Downham (a5), Karen Kelley (a6), Stephanie L. Booth (a6), Heather Weirich (a7), Alicia Shugart (a1), Christi Lines (a1), Anna Melville (a1), John A. Jernigan (a1), David G. Kleinbaum (a1) (a8) and Priti R. Patel (a1)...

Abstract

Among dialysis facilities participating in a bloodstream infection (BSI) prevention collaborative, access-related BSI incidence rate improvements observed immediately following implementation of a bundle of BSI prevention interventions were sustained for up to 4 years. Overall, BSI incidence remained unchanged from baseline in the current analysis.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:863–866

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Sustained Infection Reduction in Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers Participating in a Collaborative Bloodstream Infection Prevention Effort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Sustained Infection Reduction in Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers Participating in a Collaborative Bloodstream Infection Prevention Effort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Sustained Infection Reduction in Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers Participating in a Collaborative Bloodstream Infection Prevention Effort
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address all correspondence to Sarah Yi, PhD, 1600 Clifton Road, MS A-16, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027 (sarahyi@cdc.gov).

Footnotes

Hide All

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. These findings were presented in part at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week 2013 Annual Meeting, November 8, 2013, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1. Patel, PR, Yi, SH, Booth, S, et al. Bloodstream infection rates in outpatient hemodialysis facilities participating in a collaborative prevention effort: a quality improvement report. Am J Kidney Dis 2013;62:322330.
2. Hemodialysis Central Venous Catheter Scrub-the-Hub Protocol. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/dialysis/PDFs/collaborative/Hemodialysis-Central-Venous-Catheter-STH-Protocol.pdf. Accessed March 12, 2015.
3. CDC Approach to BSI Prevention in Dialysis Facilities. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/dialysis/prevention-tools/core-interventions.html. Accessed June 29, 2015.
4. National Healthcare Safety Network Dialysis Event Protocol. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/PDFs/pscManual/8pscDialysisEventcurrent.pdf. Accessed January 12, 2016.
5. Wagner, AK, Soumerai, SB, Zhang, F, Ross-Degnan, D. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series studies in medication use research. J Clin Pharm Ther 2002;27:299309.
6. Morel, JG, Bokossa, MC, Neerchal, NK. Small sample correction for the variance of GEE estimators. Biom J 2003;45:395409.
7. Pronovost, PJ, Goeschel, CA, Colantuoni, E, et al. Sustaining reductions in catheter related bloodstream infections in Michigan intensive care units: observational study. BMJ 2010;340:c309.
8. Rosenblum, A, Wang, W, Ball, LK, Latham, C, Maddux, FW, Lacson, E Jr. Hemodialysis catheter care strategies: a cluster-randomized quality improvement initiative. Am J Kidney Dis 2014;63:259267.
9. Penfold, RB, Zhang, F. Use of interrupted time series analysis in evaluating health care quality improvements. Acad Pediatr 2013;13:S38S44.

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed