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Backlash against international courts: explaining the forms and patterns of resistance to international courts

  • Mikael Rask Madsen (a1), Pola Cebulak (a2) and Micha Wiebusch (a3)

Abstract

The paper investigates and theorises different forms and patterns of resistance to international courts (ICs) and develops an analytical framework for explaining their variability. In order to make intelligible the resistance that many ICs are currently facing, the paper first unpacks the concept of resistance. It then introduces a key distinction between mere pushback from individual Member States or other actors, seeking to influence the future direction of a court's case-law, and actual backlash – a critique triggering significant institutional reform or even the dismantling of tribunals. On the basis on the proposed theoretical framework, the paper provides a roadmap for empirical studies of resistance to ICs, considering the key contextual factors necessary to take into account in such studies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author. E-mail: mikael.madsen@jur.ku.dk

References

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Keywords

Backlash against international courts: explaining the forms and patterns of resistance to international courts

  • Mikael Rask Madsen (a1), Pola Cebulak (a2) and Micha Wiebusch (a3)

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