Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 4
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    McDonald, Sean and Moore, Simon 2015. Communicating Identity in the Ottoman Empire and Some Implications for Contemporary States. Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 23, Issue. 5, p. 269.


    Ben-Bassat, Yuval 2014. A Zionist torn between two worlds: Aharon Eisenberg's correspondence after the Young Turk Revolution. Journal of Israeli History, Vol. 33, Issue. 1, p. 25.


    Pollard, Lisa 2014. EGYPTIAN BY ASSOCIATION: CHARITABLE STATES AND SERVICE SOCIETIES, CIRCA 1850–1945. International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 46, Issue. 02, p. 239.


    Ueno, Masayuki 2013. “FOR THE FATHERLAND AND THE STATE”: ARMENIANS NEGOTIATE THE TANZIMAT REFORMS. International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 45, Issue. 01, p. 93.


    ×
  • International Journal of Middle East Studies, Volume 44, Issue 2
  • May 2012, pp. 237-255

BETWEEN CIVIC AND ISLAMIC OTTOMANISM: JEWISH IMPERIAL CITIZENSHIP IN THE HAMIDIAN ERA

Abstract
Abstract

This article explores the responses of Sephardi Jews to two moments of heightened tension and politicized violence in the Ottoman Empire during the late 19th century—the massacres of Armenians in Istanbul in 1896 and the Greco–Ottoman War of 1897. It argues that many of the strategies of representation that Jewish elites employed during these moments speak to their ability and willingness to work within a framework of Islamic Ottomanism. Recognizing this pattern complicates scholarly assumptions about the relationship of religious minorities to the deployment of state religion in general and about the responses of non-Muslims to the Hamidian regime's mobilization of Islam more specifically. Identifying the pattern is not to celebrate it, however. Sephardi Jews' relationship with Islamic Ottomanism was in many cases deeply ambivalent. Finding themselves torn between civic and Islamic forms of imperial identification during this period, Ottoman Jews soon learned that both positions could entail uncomfortable choices and disturbing consequences.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Julia Phillips Cohen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and the Program in Jewish Studies, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.; e-mail: julia.p.cohen@vanderbilt.edu
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Robert Crews , “Empire and the Confessional State: Islam and Religious Politics in Nineteenth-Century Russia,” American Historical Review 108 (2003): 5083, 57

Janet Klein , The Margins of Empire: Kurdish Militias in the Ottoman Tribal Zone (Palo Alto, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2011)

Mustafa Aksakal , “Holy War Made in Germany? Ottoman Origins of the 1914 Jihad,” War in History 18 (2011): 184–99, 199

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

International Journal of Middle East Studies
  • ISSN: 0020-7438
  • EISSN: 1471-6380
  • URL: /core/journals/international-journal-of-middle-east-studies
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×