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Growth-inhibitory effects of proteinaceous fractions from resistant wild bean accessions on the bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

Luisa F. Fory
Affiliation:
Biotechnology Research Unit, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia Bean Programme, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia
Fernando A. Tenjo
Affiliation:
Biotechnology Research Unit, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia
Carmen E. Posso
Affiliation:
Bean Programme, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia
Cesar Cardona
Affiliation:
Bean Programme, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia
Jorge E. Mayer
Affiliation:
Biotechnology Research Unit, A.A. 6713 Cali, Colombia

Abstract

This study was conducted to identify the individual biochemical factors involved in the resistance observed in a few Mexican bean accessions against the bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Soluble proteins from different bean genotypes were separated by fractionated acetone precipitation. Insects were reared on artifical seeds composed of a susceptible background bean flour enriched with the different protein fractions. At low doses (2% w/w), the 0–20% and 20–40% acetone fractions of the resistant bean accessions G 12954 and G 12880 inhibited larval growth of the bean weevil, but not of a related species, the Mexican bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman). The 0–20% fraction caused the highest mortality of first instar larvae. The 60–80% acetone fraction contains general resistance factors, like α-amylase and protease inhibitors, which when enriched in artifical seeds led to a strong depression of insect growth for resistant and susceptible bean accessions alike. These factors should also be taken into account in breeding for multigenic, durable resistance, in order to exploit the synergism between general and specific resistance factors.

Résumé

Cette étude a été menée afin d'identifier des facteurs biochimiques particuliers impliqués dans la résistance observée sur quelques acquisitions de haricot mexicain contre le charançon du haricot, Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Des protéines solubles obtenues à partir de différentes génotypes de haricot ont été séparées par précipitation fractionnée à l'acétone. Des insectes ont été élevés sur des graines artificielles composées à partir d'une farine de haricot susceptible enrichie avec les différentes fractions protéiniques. Aux faibles concentrations (2% w/w), des fractions acétonées de 0–20% et 20–40% des acquisitions de haricot résistant G 12954 et G 12880, ont inhibé la croissance larvaire du charançon du haricot, mais non celle de l'espèce voisine de charançon mexicaine, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman). La fraction 0–20% a provoqué la mortalité élevée chez les larves du 1er stade. La fraction acétonée 60–80% contient des facteurs de la résistance générale, tels que α-amylase et des inhibiteurs de la protease qui, lorsqu'ils sont enrichis dans des farines, aboutissent à une forte baisse de la croissance pour des acquisitions des haricots tant résistants que susceptibles. Ces facteurs doivent être pris en compte dans une selection multigénique durable, afin d'exploiter le synergisme entre des facteurs de la résistance générale et spécifique.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1995

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Growth-inhibitory effects of proteinaceous fractions from resistant wild bean accessions on the bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus
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