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Reflecting on Women on the Line: Continuities and Change in Women's Work

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 July 2012

Miriam Glucksmann
Affiliation:
University of Essex

Extract

Historically there has been a variety of ways for academics to engage with working people or to combine activism with scholarship. Women on the Line represents a historically specific form of engagement that was open to western feminists at the height of second wave feminism in the 1970s.

Type
Thirty Years on from Women on the Line: Researching Gender and Work
Copyright
Copyright © International Labor and Working-Class History, Inc. 2012

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References

NOTES

I am indebted to the Economic and Social Research Council for funding my Professorial Fellowship research program, “Transformations of Work: New Frontiers, Shifting Boundaries, Changing temporalities” (RES-051-27-0015), and to the European Research Council Advanced Investigator Grant for funding continuing research on “Consumption Work and Societal Divisions of Labour.” For further detail, see http://www.essex.ac.uk/sociology/staff/profile.aspx?ID=130.

1. Cavendish, Ruth, Women on the Line (London, 1982)Google Scholar; second edition with new introduction, Miriam Glucksmann a.k.a Ruth Cavendish (London, 2009).

2. Beynon, Huw, Working for Ford (Harmondsworth, 1984)Google Scholar; Burawoy, Michael, Manufacturing Consent: Changes in the Labor Process under Monopoly Capitalism (Chicago, 1979)Google Scholar.

3. Pollert, Anna, Girls, Wives, Factory Lives (London, 1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

4. Westwood, Sallie, All Day Every Day (London, 1984)Google Scholar.

5. Ngai, Pun, Made in China: Women Factory Workers in a Global Workplace (Durham, NC, 2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

6. Miriam Glucksmann with Nolan, Jane, “New Technologies and the Transformations of Women's Labour at Home and Work,” Equal Opportunities International 26 (2007): 96112Google Scholar. Miriam Glucksmann “Transformation of work: ‘Ready-made’ Food and New International Divisions of Labour,” paper to Transformations of Work workshop, Faculty of Political Science, University of Cagliari, Sardinia, 2008. Glucksmann, Miriam, “Les plats cuisinés et la nouvelle division internationale du travail,” in Le Sexe de la Mondialisation, eds.Falquet, J. et al. (Paris, 2010), 8598.Google Scholar

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