Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-k2x4h Total loading time: 0.359 Render date: 2022-07-07T13:59:05.187Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The politics of the philosophy of science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2009

Milja Kurki*
Affiliation:
Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK
*

Abstract

Monteiro and Ruby (2009) argue that International Relations (IR) scholars should look to adopt a more ‘tentative attitude’ towards the philosophy of science (PoS) frameworks in IR. This is an attractive and timely call for more open-minded PoS argumentation in the field. Yet, the logic of Monteiro and Ruby’s argument is not (rather characteristically of PoS debates) infallible. As other commentaries in this forum show, it is not self-evident that Monteiro and Ruby’s account is ‘post-foundational’, or that it is premised on an accurate reading of existing PoS positions in IR. However, I do not here wish to elaborate further on the critiques that could be made of the internal coherence of Monteiro and Ruby’s argumentation or their reading of core philosophical schools. Instead, I want to discuss a different kind of an issue raised by Monteiro and Ruby’s intervention: their treatment of the interaction of political forms of argumentation and PoS debates.

Type
Meeting Report
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

1

Many thanks to Colin Wight for his comments on an earlier draft and to the anonymous reviewers and the editors for their detailed commentaries and suggestions. Thanks also to Tim Dunne, Steve Smith, Hidemi Suganami and Jenny Edkins for useful discussions on the arguments presented here.

References

Bhaskar, R. (1989), Possibility of Naturalism, 2nd edn, Brighton: Harverster Wheatsheaf.Google Scholar
Bhaskar, R. (1991), Philosophy and the Idea of Freedom, London: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Brown, C. (2007), ‘Situating critical realism’, Millennium 35(2): 409416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collier, A. (1988), Scientific Realism and Socialist Thought, Brighton: Harvester Press.Google Scholar
Collier, A. (2003), In Defence of Objectivity, London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Fuller, S. (2004), Kuhn vs Popper: Struggle for the Soul of Science, New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Habermas, J. (1971), Knowledge and Human Interests, Boston: Beacon.Google Scholar
Harding, S. (1991), Whose Science? Whose Knowledge?, Milton Keynes: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Horkheimer, M.Adorno, T. (1972), Dialectic of Enlightenment, New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
Joseph, J. (2007), ‘Philosophy in international relations: a scientific realist approach’, Millennium 35: 345356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keat, R. (1981), The Politics of Social Theory, Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
King, G., Keohane, R.O.Verba, S. (1994), Designing Social Inquiry; Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research, Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Kratochwil, F. (2007), ‘Of false promises and good bets: a plea for a pragmatic approach to theory building (the Tartu lecture)’, Journal of International Relations and Development 10: 115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kurki, M. (2008), Causation in International Relations: Reclaiming Causal Analysis, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kurki, M.Sinclair, A. (forthcoming) ‘Hidden in plain sight: social constructivist analysis of social context and its limitations’, International Politics.Google Scholar
Monteiro, N.P.Ruby, K. (2009), ‘The false promise of philosophical foundations’, International Theory 1(1): 149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nicholson, M. (1996), Causes and Consequences in International Relations: A Conceptual Study, London: Pinter.Google Scholar
Patomäki, H.Wight, C. (2000), ‘After post-positivism? the promises of critical realism’, International Studies Quarterly 44(2): 213237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Patomäki, H. (2002), After International Relations: Critical Realism and the (Re)construction of World Politics, London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Popper, K.R. (1966), The Open Society and its Enemies, Vol. II, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Price, R. (ed.) (2008), ‘Moral limit and possibility in world politics’, in Moral Limit and Possibility in World Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reus-Smit, C. (2008), ‘Constructivism and the structure of ethical reasoning’, in R. Price (ed.), Moral Limit and Possibility in World Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 5382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rorty, R. (1989), Contingency, Irony and Solidarity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rorty, R. (1991), Objectivity, Relativism and Truth: Philosophical Papers, Vol. 1, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Rupert, M. (2000), Ideologies of Globalization: Contending Visions of a New World Order, London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Sayer, A. (2000), Realism and Social Science, London: SAGE.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, S. (1997), ‘Power and truth: a reply to Wallace’, Review of International Studies 23(4): 507516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zehfuss, M. (2002), Constructivism in International Relations: The Politics of Reality, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wendt, A. (1999), Social Theory of International Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wight, C. (2006), Agents and Structures in International Relations: Politics as Ontology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winch, P. (1990), The Idea of Social Science and its relation to philosophy, 2nd edn, London: Routledge.Google Scholar
9
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The politics of the philosophy of science
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The politics of the philosophy of science
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The politics of the philosophy of science
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *