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Reification, practice, and the ontological status of social facts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2020

Simon Frankel Pratt*
Affiliation:
University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics, and International Studies, 11 Priory Rd., Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
*
Corresponding author. E-mail: simon.pratt@mail.utoronto.ca

Abstract

In this reply to Miles Evers, I clarify some of my positions and argue that social facts should not be reified. Just as with norms, they should be defined as arrangements of practices rather than as social objects.

Type
Original Papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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