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Simulated mechanical control of flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus) under mesocosm conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2019

Gray Turnage
Affiliation:
Research Associate II, Geosystems Research Institute, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA
John D. Madsen
Affiliation:
Research Biologist, USDA ARS ISPHRU, Plant Sciences Department, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA, USA
Ryan M. Wersal
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Minnesota State University–Mankato, Mankato, MN, USA
John D. Byrd
Affiliation:
Extension/Research Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus L.) is an invasive aquatic and wetland plant capable of developing monotypic stands in emergent and submersed sites. This plant can rapidly outcompete native vegetation and impede human practices by reducing recreation (boating, fishing, and skiing) and disrupting agricultural use of water resources (irrigation canals). Mechanical removal practices occurring biweekly, monthly, bimonthly, and once per growing season were compared with chemical control with diquat applied sequentially at 0.19 ppmv ai for two consecutive months over 2 yr (2016 and 2017). Biweekly removal gave the most consistent control of B. umbellatus biomass and propagules. Diquat application along with monthly and bimonthly clippings gave varying degrees of B. umbellatus control. Clipping once per growing season did not control B. umbellatus when compared with reference plants, while clipping B. umbellatus every 2 wk (biweekly) controlled rush propagules most effectively. However, it is unlikely this method will be sufficient as a stand-alone control option due to the slow speed of harvester boats, the potential these boats have to spread B. umbellatus propagules to more sites, and the expense of mechanical operations. However, clipping could be used as part of an integrated strategy for B. umbellatus control.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Rob J. Richardson, North Carolina State University

References

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