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Polyvagal theory, neurodevelopment and psychiatric disorders

  • M. O. Huttunen (a1) and S. A. Mednick (a2)
Abstract

Neurodevelopment is an area of psychiatry which has attracted huge interest in the last few decades. There is substantial evidence that perinatal events can contribute to later development of mental disorder. In the current perspective article we propose a novel polyvagal theory which attempts to link prenatal events with neurodevelopment and the later onset of psychiatric disorder.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: M. O. Huttunen, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. (Email: matti.huttunen@konsmoh.inet.fi)
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Passed away April, 2015

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References
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Huttunen MO, Niskanen P (1978). Prenatal loss of father and psychiatric disorders. Archives of General Psychiatry 35, 429431.
Mednick SM, Machón RA, Huttunen MO, Bonnet D (1988). Adult schizophrenia following prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic. Archives of General Psychiatry 45, 189192.
Machón RA, Mednick SA, Huttunen MO (1997). Adult major affective disorder after prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic. Archives of General Psychiatry 54, 322328.
Cannon M, Clarke MC, Cotter DR (2014). Priming the brain for psychosis: maternal inflammation during fetal development and the risk of later psychiatric disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry 171, 901905.
Porges SW (2007). The polyvagal perspective. Biological Psychology 74, 118143.
Sachis PN, Armstrong DL, Becker LE, Bryan AC (1982). Myelination of the human vagus nerve from 24 weeks postconceptual age to adolescence. Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology 41, 466472.
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Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine
  • ISSN: 0790-9667
  • EISSN: 2051-6967
  • URL: /core/journals/irish-journal-of-psychological-medicine
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