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Does Internet usage inspire offline political participation? Analyzing the Taiwanese case

  • Alex Chuan-hsien Chang (a1)

Abstract

With the emergence of new information and communication technologies, scholars and politicians view the Internet as a means both to govern and to bring citizens, especially younger generations, closer to the political process. Given the tremendous impacts of the Sunflower Movement on Taiwanese politics, this paper sets out to dynamically examine whether and to what extent the Internet inspired offline electoral and non-electoral participations of Taiwanese young adults. While the younger generation's Internet usage for political causes significantly encouraged their voting turnout in the 2014 election, a similar effect was not detected in either the 2012 or 2016 presidential and legislative elections. The estimated statistics not only show the particular effect of the Sunflower Movement on young adults' voting turnout and participation in self-help activities in the 2014 election, but also reveal that the fast-changing and diverse Internet domain did not have a long-lasting influence on young citizens' political engagement in the offline world.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. E-mail: chang626@gate.sinica.edu.tw

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Does Internet usage inspire offline political participation? Analyzing the Taiwanese case

  • Alex Chuan-hsien Chang (a1)

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