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TASTE TRUMPS HEALTH AND SAFETY: INCORPORATING CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS INTO A DISCRETE CHOICE EXPERIMENT FOR MEAT

  • TREY MALONE (a1) and JAYSON L. LUSK (a1)
Abstract

Consumers implicitly incorporate their perceptions of products into their decision processes, yet little research has explicitly focused on how those perceptions influence demand for meat. This study incorporates taste, health, and safety perceptions into a discrete choice experiment for meat products at a grocery store. Our results indicate that taste is the most important perception as a 1-unit increase in the perceived tastiness (on a −5 to +5 scale) of a food product leads to a $0.60 increase in willingness to pay, whereas equivalent increases in perceived health and safety lead to $0.31 and $0.21 increases, respectively.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: e-mail: trey.malone@okstate.edu
Footnotes
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The project was partially supported by the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station, the Willard Sparks Endowment at Oklahoma State, and the Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture (grant number 2015-67023-23134).
Footnotes
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