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Assessment of groundnut cultivars for end-of-season drought tolerance in a Sahelian environment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

B. J. Ndunguru
Affiliation:
SADC/ICRISAT Groundnut and ICRISAT Regional Pigeonpea Projects, PO Box 1096, Lilongwe, Malawi
B. R. Ntare
Affiliation:
ICRISAT Sahelian Centre, BP 12404, Niamey, Niger
J. H. Williams
Affiliation:
ICRISAT Sahelian Centre, BP 12404, Niamey, Niger
D. C. Greenberg
Affiliation:
23 Pierce Lane, Fulbourn, Cambridge CB1 5DJ, UK

Summary

A 2–year study (1990 and 1991) was conducted at the ICRISAT (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics) Sahelian Centre, near Niamey, Niger, to select groundnut cultivars tolerant to drought and to examine selection techniques. Thirty-six cultivars known to vary in yield potential were grown under rainfed and irrigated conditions. Crop growth rate (C) and partitioning co-efficient (p) were estimated from phenological and final harvest data. The correlation between years was greater for partitioning than for pod yield (implying a higher heritability for p than for yield). Tolerance as determined by a drought susceptibility index for pod yield (SY), crop growth rate (Sc) and partitioning (Sp) to reproductive sinks showed thirteen cultivars as drought tolerant for either C or p or for both. The Sahelian cultivars 796, 55–437 and TS 32–1 were the most consistent for drought tolerance. Partitioning was the most important yield component affecting yield variation among cultivars.

Type
Crops and Soils
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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