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Biochemistry of water-logged soils. Part IV. Carbon and nitrogen transformations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

A. Sreenivasan
Affiliation:
(Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.)
V. Subrahmanyan
Affiliation:
(Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.)

Extract

1. During the fermentation of water-logged soil containing added substances with different carbon-nitrogen ratios, the reaction first turns slightly acid, but soon returns to the original hydrogen-ion concentration (pH 7·6).

2. The quantities of ammonia present in the medium increase up to a point, after which there is steady decrease.

3. There is nitrification only in the case of substances with narrow C/N ratios. The production of nitrate generally commences only after about a month, when the vigour of the initial fermentation has subsided and fairly large quantities of ammonia have accumulated in the medium.

4. The extent of mineralisation of nitrogen is determined chiefly by the C/N ratio, though in the cases of substances like mahua and lantana the presence of other constituents may also influence the processes. The quantities of mineralised nitrogen present in the soil system generally tend to decrease after about two months.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1935

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References

REFERENCES

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