Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-jlrq2 Total loading time: 0.524 Render date: 2022-11-26T13:23:52.676Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Calcium and phosphorus utilization in growing sheep supplemented with dicalcium phosphate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 August 2012

R. S. DIAS
Affiliation:
Centre for Nutrition Modelling, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1 G 2W1, Canada
S. LÓPEZ*
Affiliation:
Instituto de Ganadería de Montaña, Universidad de León – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Departamento de Producción Animal, Universidad de León, 24071 León, Spain
R. M. PATIÑO
Affiliation:
Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad de Sucre, Carrera 28 5-267, Sincelejo, Sucre, Colombia
T. S. SILVA
Affiliation:
Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
J. C. SILVA FILHO
Affiliation:
Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CEP 37200-000, Lavras, MG, Brazil
D. M. S. S. VITTI
Affiliation:
Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
M. R. S. R. PEÇANHA
Affiliation:
Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
E. KEBREAB
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
J. FRANCE
Affiliation:
Centre for Nutrition Modelling, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1 G 2W1, Canada
*
*To whom all correspondence should be addressed. Email: s.lopez@unileon.es

Summary

The objective of the current study was to evaluate the utilization of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) in growing sheep consuming increasing amounts of dicalcium phosphate. Eighteen growing sheep, aged 8 months, were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0, 12·5 and 25 g of dicalcium phosphate/day. During the experiment, animals were injected intravenously with 7·4 MBq of 45Ca and 32P and samples of plasma, faeces and urine were subsequently taken daily for 1 week after injection. Rumen fluid was sampled on days 4–7 after injection. Specific radioactivity in plasma and in faeces were used to determine true absorption of Ca and P, whereas plasmatic and ruminal specific radio-activities were used to determine endogenous P flow into the rumen and turnover time of rumen P. Increasing dicalcium phosphate intake led to linear increases in faecal excretion of endogenous Ca and P (P<0·05), suggesting that surpluses of ingested Ca and P were voided through secretion to the gut. True absorption coefficients for 0, 12·5 and 25 g of dicalcium phosphate ingested daily were 0·54, 0·41 and 0·38 for Ca, and 0·66, 0·62 and 0·64 for P, respectively. Flows of endogenous P into the rumen increased linearly and ruminal turnover time of P decreased linearly (P<0·01) as P intake was increased. Concentrations of Ca and P in bone were not affected by the increased amounts of these minerals ingested (P<0·05). In conclusion, increasing ingestion of dicalcium phosphate increases faecal excretion of Ca and P, thus decreasing the efficiency of utilization of both minerals. Moreover, increasing levels of dietary P increased endogenous P excretion, contributing to the amount of P disposed of in the environment.

Type
Animal Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Ammerman, C. B., Forbes, R. M., Garrigus, U. S., Newmann, A. L., Norton, H. W. & Hatfield, E. E. (1957). Ruminant utilization of inorganic phosphates. Journal of Animal Science 16, 796810.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arrington, L. R., Outler, J. C., Ammerman, C. B. & Davis, G. K. (1963). Absorption, retention and tissue deposition of labeled inorganic phosphate by cattle. Journal of Animal Science 22, 940942.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) (1995). Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC, 16th edn. Arlington, VA, USA: Association of Official Analytical Chemists International.Google Scholar
Bannink, A., Šebek, L. & Dijkstra, J. (2010). Efficiency of phosphorus and calcium utilization in dairy cattle and implications for the environment. In Phosphorus and Calcium Utilization and Requirements in Farm Animals (Eds Vitti, D. M. S. S. & Kebreab, E.), pp. 151172. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Belonje, P. C. & Van Den Berg, A. (1983). Failure of bone phosphorus levels to indicate dietary intake of phosphorus by sheep. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 50, 12.Google ScholarPubMed
Braithwaite, G. D. (1982). Endogenous faecal loss of calcium by ruminants. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 99, 355358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Braithwaite, G. D. (1984). Some observations on phosphorus homeostasis and requirement of sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 102, 295306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Braithwaite, G. D. & Riazuddin, S. (1971). The effect of age and level of dietary calcium intake on calcium metabolism in sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 26, 215225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bravo, D., Sauvant, D., Bogaert, C. & Meschy, F. (2003). II. Quantitative aspects of phosphorus absorption in ruminants. Reproduction Nutrition Development 43, 271284.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chapuis-Lardy, L., Fiorini, J., Toth, J. & Dou, Z. (2004). Phosphorus concentration and solubility in dairy feces: variability and affecting factors. Journal of Dairy Science 87, 43344341.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chrisp, J. S., Sykes, A. R. & Grace, N. D. (1989 a). Kinetic aspects of calcium metabolism in lactating sheep offered herbages with different Ca concentrations and the effect of protein supplementation. British Journal of Nutrition 61, 4558.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chrisp, J. S. & Sykes, A. R. & Grace, N. D. (1989 b). Faecal endogenous loss of calcium in young sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 61, 5965.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dias, R. S., Lopez, S., Silva, T., Pardo, R. M. P., Silva Filho, J. C., Vitti, D. M. S. S., Kebreb, E. & France, J. (2009). Rumen phosphorus metabolism in sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 147, 391398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esser, N. M., Hoffman, P. C., Coblentz, W. K., Orth, M. W. & Weigel, K. A. (2009). The effect of dietary phosphorus on bone development in dairy heifers. Journal of Dairy Science 92, 17411749.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fiske, C. H. & Subbarow, Y. (1925). The colorimetric determination of phosphorus. Journal of Biological Chemistry 66, 375400.Google Scholar
France, J., Dias, R. S., Kebreab, E., Vitti, D. M. S. S., Crompton, L. A. & López, S. (2010). Kinetic models for the study of phosphorus metabolism in ruminants and monogastrics. In Phosphorus and Calcium Utilization and Requirements in Farm Animals (Eds Vitti, D. M. S. S. & Kebreab, E.), pp. 1844. Wallingford, Oxon, UK: CAB International.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grace, N. D., Carr, D. H. & Reid, C. S. W. (1985). Secretion of sodium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium via the parotid and mandibular saliva in sheep-offered chaffed lucerne hay or fresh ‘Grasslands Ruanui’ perennial ryegrass. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 28, 449455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, R. R. & McClure, K. E. (1967). Sequestering phosphatic solution as a phosphorus source for ruminants. Journal of Dairy Science 50, 15021504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kincaid, R. L. & Rodehutscord, M. (2005). Phosphorus metabolism in the rumen. In Nitrogen and Phosphorus Nutrition of Cattle and the Environment (Eds Pfeffer, E. & Hristov, A.), pp. 187193. Wallingford, Oxon, UK: CAB International.Google Scholar
Lofgreen, G. P. (1960). The availability of the phosphorus in dicalcium phosphate, bonemeal, soft phosphate and calcium phytate for mature weathers. Journal of Nutrition 70, 5862.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lofgreen, G. P. & Kleiber, M. (1953). The availability of the phosphorus in alfalfa hay. Journal of Animal Science 12, 366371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Long, T. A., Tillman, A. D., Nelson, A. B., Gallup, W. D. & Davis, B. (1957). Availability of phosphorus in mineral supplements for beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science 16, 444450.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martz, F. A., Belo, A. T., Weiss, M. F. & Belyea, R. L. (1999). True absorption of calcium and phosphorus from corn silage fed to nonlactating, pregnant dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science 82, 618622.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mertens, D. R. (2002). Gravimetric determination of amylase-treated neutral detergent fiber in feeds using refluxing in beakers or crucibles: collaborative study. Journal of AOAC International 82, 12171240.Google Scholar
Miller, W. J. (1975). New concepts and developments in metabolism and homeostasis of inorganic elements in dairy cattle: a review. Journal of Dairy Science 58, 15491560.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Research Council (NRC) (1985). Nutrient Requirements of Sheep, 6th Revised edn. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
National Research Council (NRC) (2007). Nutrient Requirements of Small Ruminants. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
O'Donovan, J. P., Plumlee, M. P., Smith, W. H. & Beeson, W. M. (1965). Availability of phosphorus in dicalcium phosphates and defluorinated phosphate for steers. Journal Animal Science 24, 981985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pfeffer, E., Beede, D. K. & Valk, H. (2005). Phosphorus metablolism in ruminants and requirements of cattle. In Nitrogen and Phosphorus Nutrition of Cattle and the Environment (Eds Pfeffer, E. & Hristov, A.), pp. 195231. Wallingford, Oxon, UK: CAB International.Google Scholar
Roque, A. P., Dias, R. S., Vitti, D. M. S. S., da Silva Bueno, I. C., da Cunha, E. A., dos Santos, L. E. & Bueno, M. S. (2007). True digestibility of calcium from source used in finishing lambs diets. Small Ruminant Research 71, 243249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SAS Institute Inc. (1999). SAS/STAT User's Guide Version 8. Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc.Google Scholar
Sarruge, J. R. & Haag, H. P. (1974). Chemical Analysis of Plants. Piracicaba, Brazil: Departamento de Química, Escola Superior de Agricultura ‘Luiz de Queiroz’.Google Scholar
Smith, A. H., Kleiber, M., Black, A. L. & Baxter, C. F. (1955). Transfer of phosphate in the digestive tract. II. Sheep. Journal of Nutrition 57, 507527.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Taylor, M. S., Knowlton, K. F., Mcgilliard, M. L., Swecker, W. S., Ferguson, J. D., Wu, Z. & Hanigan, M. D. (2009). Dietary calcium has little effect on mineral balance and bone mineral metabolism through twenty weeks of lactation in Holstein cows. Journal of Dairy Science 92, 223237.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tillman, A. D. & Brethour, J. R. (1958). Dicalcium phosphate and phosphoric acid as phosphorus sources for beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science 17, 100103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tomas, F. M. (1974 a). Phosphorus homeostasis in sheep. II. Influence of diet on the pathway of excretion of phosphorus. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 25, 485493.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tomas, F. M. (1974 b). Phosphorus homeostasis in sheep. III. Relationship between the amount of salivary phosphorus secreted and the quantities of phosphorus excreted via the urine and faeces. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 25, 495507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Veum, T. L. (2010). Phosphorus and calcium nutrition and metabolism. In Phosphorus and Calcium Utilization and Requirements in Farm Animals (Eds. Kebreab, E. & Vitti, D. M. S. S.), pp. 94111. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vitti, D. M. S. S., Kebreab, E., Lopes, J. B., Abdalla, A. L., de Carvalhos, F. F. R., de Resende, K. T., Crompton, L. A. & France, J. (2000). A kinetic model of phosphorus metabolism in growing goats. Journal of Animal Science 78, 27062712.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitti, D. M. S. S., Silva-Filho, J. C., Louvandini, H., Dias, R. S., Bueno, I. C. S. & Kebreab, E. (2010). Phosphorus and calcium utilization in ruminants using isotope dilution techniques. In Phosphorus and Calcium Utilization and Requirements in Farm Animals (Eds Vitti, D. M. S. S. & Kebreab, E.), pp. 4567. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wan Zahari, M., Thompson, J. K., Scott, D. & Buchan, W. (1990). The dietary requirements of calcium and phosphorus for growing lambs. Animal Production 50, 301307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, S. N., Lawrence, L. A., McDowell, L. R., Wilkinson, N. S., Ferguson, P. W. & Warnick, A. C. (1991). Criteria to evaluate bone mineralization in cattle: effects of dietary phosphorus on chemical, physical and mechanical properties. Journal of Animal Science 69, 12321242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Young, V. R., Lofgreen, G. P. & Luick, J. R. (1966). The effects of phosphorus depletion, and of calcium and phosphorus intake, on the endogenous excretion of these elements by sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 20, 795805.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zagatto, E. A. G., Krug, F. J., Bergamim Filho, H., Jorgensen, S. S. & Reis, B. F. (1979). Margin zones in flow injection analysis. Part 2. Determination of calcium, magnesium and potassium in plant material by flow injection atomic and flame emission spectrometry. Analytica Chimica Acta 104, 279284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Calcium and phosphorus utilization in growing sheep supplemented with dicalcium phosphate
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Calcium and phosphorus utilization in growing sheep supplemented with dicalcium phosphate
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Calcium and phosphorus utilization in growing sheep supplemented with dicalcium phosphate
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *