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Changes of sugars, β-carotene and firmness of refrigerated Ataulfo mangoes treated with exogenous ethylene

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2009

E. MONTALVO
Affiliation:
Laboratorio de Investigación de Alimentos, Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic, Apdo. Postal 634, Tepic, Nayarit, México UNIDA, Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz, M.A. de Quevedo 2779, Veracruz, Ver. 91897, México
Y. ADAME
Affiliation:
Laboratorio de Investigación de Alimentos, Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic, Apdo. Postal 634, Tepic, Nayarit, México
H. S. GARCÍA
Affiliation:
UNIDA, Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz, M.A. de Quevedo 2779, Veracruz, Ver. 91897, México
B. TOVAR
Affiliation:
Laboratorio de Investigación de Alimentos, Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic, Apdo. Postal 634, Tepic, Nayarit, México
M. MATA*
Affiliation:
Laboratorio de Investigación de Alimentos, Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic, Apdo. Postal 634, Tepic, Nayarit, México
*
*To whom all correspondence should be addressed. Email: mmata@tepic.megared.net.mx

Summary

The export of Ataulfo mangoes to the US market involves a mandatory hot water treatment and further handling at 13°C for 4 days. These treatments have proven to adversely affect fruit ripening, mainly in colour and flavour development, and their nutritional quality. The application of exogenous ethylene (100 μl/l of air for 12 h at 25°C) to Ataulfo mangoes that were treated with hot water after storage for 4 days at 13°C, and then transferred to 25°C for ripening, was evaluated. Sugar content, colour development and textural firmness were monitored. Control fruit were held at 25°C with no previous refrigeration or ethylene exposure; another batch was kept refrigerated for 4 days at 13°C, not treated with ethylene and ripened at 25°C. Synthesis of fructose (30 g/kg fresh weight (FW)), glucose (38 g/kg FW), sucrose (120 g/kg FW) and β-carotene (0·026 g/kg FW) in the last day of storage was greater in fruits treated with ethylene than on refrigerated mangoes (RM). Loss of firmness (9·3 Newtons) coincided with the highest pectinmethylesterase and polygalacturonase activities, 53·24 and 37·92 U/mg protein, respectively, and eventually led to collapse of cell structure. Results suggest that sugars and carotenoid content can be increased, along with an accelerated ripening by application of exogenous ethylene on mangoes that were refrigerated for 4 days.

Type
Crops and Soils
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Cambridge University Press

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References

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