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Effect of linseed oil fatty acids and linseed oil on rumen fermentation in sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

J. W. Czerkawski
Affiliation:
The Hannah Research Institute, Ayr, KA6 5HL

Summary

Three experiments were made, in which two, four and three sheep were given rations in which increasing amounts of linseed oil fatty acids or Unseed oil were incorporated.

Although the changes in the rumen fermentation patterns were similar in all sheep, in some sheep the lipid metabolism in the rumen appeared abnormal, inasmuch as there was considerable accumulation of palmitic and smaller amounts of myristic acid.

It was concluded that the increases in the concentration of palmitic acid were due to an increased rate of its synthesis in the rumen, and an attempt was made to calculate these rates approximately.

The significance of these results within the context of rumen fermentation, methanogenesis and its inhibition were discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1973

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References

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