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The effect of rate of application of nitrogen fertilizer on soil copper uptake by barley under unirrigated conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

R. C. Tiwari
Affiliation:
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India
J. Adinarayana
Affiliation:
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India

Summary

Field experiments were conducted on four barley cultivars (two hulled and two hullless) grown under unirrigated conditions in Varanasi, India, to observe the effect of rate of application of nitrogen on copper concentration and uptake in plants and soils. The copper concentration in both plants and soil decreased with age of crop because of the dilution effect of more vegetative growth. Varieties did not differ in copper concentration of plants but increasing application of nitrogen decreased copper concentration in the plants. Since the hulled varieties yielded more than the hull-less ones, they removed more copper from the soil. Similarly yield was increased linearly by the application of N fertilizer and this led to a linear increase in depletion of available copper.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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